Broadcast History - June 30

Broadcast History - June 30

Postby jon » Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:52 pm

In 1969, it was "CFUN's Last Day" as a call letter change was made just before midnight, to CKVN, where VN = The Voice of News. CHUM would later purchase CKVN and change the call letters back to CFUN on October 1, 1973. But not before paying a significant sum to induce a New Brunswick station to give up the call letters (they became CFAN). You can hear both 1410-Vancouver call letter changes at http://www.radiowest.ca/sound.html under LAUNCHES and CALL LETTER/FREQ CHANGES.

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In 1973, the Alberta government created a new Crown Corporation, the Alberta Education Communications Corporation, which, in turn, created a subsidiary, ACCESS Alberta, to which the licenses of CKUA AM & FM could be transferred from Alberta Government Telephones. ACCESS also gained control of the government's educational radio and television production operations, and would later expand CKUA to 16 FM transmitters across the province and create ACCESS TV accessible by cable and satellite across the province. CKUA had somehow been ignored in 1948 when Federal Minister C.D. Howe stated that no province could own a radio station. But, in 1970, the federal government suddenly issued a directive to the CRTC demanding adherence to that 22 year old statement. On July 13, 1972, a second federal government directive allowed broadcast licenses to be held by an independent corporation not directly controlled by a provincial government, so long as the station met a strict definition of "educational programming". The CKUA broadcast licenses were actually transferred on March 31, 1974.

In 1984, CISL Richmond signs off 940 KHz forever at 6 p.m. But reappears on its current 650 KHz frequency at midnight the same day. A power increase to 10,000 watts day and 7,500 watts at night is delayed because the proposed Delta transmitter site is no longer available. They do eventually find a new transmitter site on the North shore of Boundary Bay in Delta, but later move back to Lulu Island in Richmond and increase night power to 9000 watts, adding a synchronized (i.e. - also on 650 KHz) rebroadcast transmitter in White Rock with 100 watts, operating at night only, to improve signal quality in White Rock and Delta. The station had originally signed on at 6 a.m. on May 1, 1980. On May 8, 1996, the station and its FM, CKZZ-FM, were purchased by Standard Radio, but today is owned by Rogers .

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In 2006, CJAT-FM Trail was granted licenses by the CRTC for repeaters in Castlegar on 90.3 MHz with 230 watts and Grand Forks on 103.3 MHz with 460 watts. CJAT-FM has a somewhat confusing history. In 1994 CJAT-AM switched to FM, from 610 KHz to 95.7 MHz with 13,500 watts, after being forced to vacate its AM transmitter site. But another CJAT-FM existed from 1968 to 1975, on 106.7 MHz with 12,600 watts. The CBC purchased the station in 1975 and it became a rebroadcaster of CBU-AM. But, during that 1968-75 period, CJAT-FM was fed on cable FM by all Canadian cable companies offering Spokane television stations as their primary U.S. network affiliates. The station also had an off-air audience in Spokane. As a result, CJAT-FM aired weather forecasts for Edmonton, Calgary and Spokane, as well as Trail. CJAT-FM simulcast CJAT-AM to the maximum permitted by CRTC regulations, with independent programming consisting mainly of background music in quarter hour blocks, patterned after the original CHQM Vancouver. With one exception: jingles replaced QM's famous 25 second musical background spoken IDs.
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