CJCE May 1922

A look back at various radio stations

CJCE May 1922

Postby cart_machine » Mon May 02, 2022 3:39 am

Here's what the Vancouver Sun station was airing during the month in the subject header. I hope I've caught all the OCR errors.

If you compare this to previous months, it appears the novelty was already wearing off and the paper's stories about radio station shrank and shrank. The broadcast schedule was pretty much set.

"Local entertainer" Eric Vale was an Englishman who came to Vancouver from Montreal. He worked as a bookkeeper before going into the life insurance profession by 1923, and appearing in amateur theatricals. The Province printed a one-page-plus feature story on him in 1957. He died in Vancouver in 1976.

The station seems to have ground problems which were fixed in the first week of the month.

420 metres is a little over 710 kHz.

Magee was a stop on the BC Electric Railway on West Boulevard at 47th.

Monday, May 1, 1922
RECEIVING OUTFIT COSTS BUT LITTLE
Radio Sets at few Dollars Bring Sun's Broadcast to Homes
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News report and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical Selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Several amateur stations located at Coquitlam which have been nightly "listening in" to the Sun Radio Programme report that it is the best they have ever heard in this district. The audibility and modulation of the voice and music is stated to be perfect.
A sensitive and high-priced receiving outfit is not needed to hear The Sun Radio Programme. An outfit costing a few dollars and using the bed spring or clothes line as an aerial may be used to bring to your home The Sun's broadcast of new sport and market returns, to say nothing of the fine musical programme included in the broadcast.
An amateur living at Magee has built for himself a radiophone receiving set at a total cost of 65 cents. He uses as his aerial the clothes line and states that on this extremely cheap set he can hear The Sun Radio Programme very clearly.
Tonight the latest release of Columbia records will be included in the broadcast and float out into the ether to be picked up by the ever-increasing number of amateurs and radiophone enthusiasts in and around Vancouver.

Tuesday, May 2, 1922
"TROVATORE” IS ON RADIO TONIGHT
"Sun" Programme Reaches Victoria Loud Enough to Fill Room
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News report and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Stay at home, tonight, radio fans and be sure to tune in the Sprott Shaw Radiophone transmitter at 7:30 p.m. Tonight's programme is sure to be a winner. Along with the regular broadcast of news reports and musical selections the complete opera of Trovatore will be sent out into the ether. You don't need to leave the house now to hear opera: just install a radiophone receiving set and The Sun will provide the rest.
The “hum” has now been entirely eliminated. Bruce Arundal, who installed the apparatus which has been such a great success, has been for the past week experimenting with a new type of transformer with which to eliminate the "hum."
Last night the new apparatus was used with great success and within a few moments after the set was put into operation many amateurs had phoned in complimenting Mr. Arundal on the success of this new apparatus. They further stated that the voice and music was much louder and clearer than before.
Victoria amateurs state that with a detector and two step amplifier, The Sun Radio Programme comes in loud enough to fill a room.

WEDNESDAY, May 3, 1922
"CARMEN" COMING ON RADIO TONIGHT
"Rigoletto" Selections Yesterday Evening Reported as "Wonderful"
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Musical selections from the opera "Rigoletto" were the feature of the broadcast last evening. Nearly the whole opera was sent out to be picked up by stations from here to the state of California. Many of the local radiophone fans reported that the opera selections were wonderful, and as a whole the broadcast was undoubtedly the best that has ever been transmitted from the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company radiophone station. Columbia records were used entirely for the "Rigoletto" concert.
The feature of tonight's radio programme to be broadcast by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company will be the latest releases of Apex records and a number of selections from the opera "Carmen."

THURSDAY, May 4, 1922
RADIO FANS ARE ON THE INCREASE
Estimated the Number Has Grown 200 Per Cent. With the Sun Service
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Grand opera was again featured in The Sun Radio Programme last evening when a number of selections from Carmen were sent out into the ether to be picked up by the radio fans.
It has been estimated that since the inauguration of radiophone broadcasting in B. C. by The Vancouver Sun that the number of amateur radio stations in British Columbia has increased 200 per cent. Electrical stores in Vancouver state that during the past month it has been impossible to keep up with the demand for radio apparatus.

FRIDAY, May 5, 1922
ENTERTAINER ON RADIO TONIGHT
Eric Vale Will Render a Number of Comic Selections
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Comic numbers by Mr. Eric Vale.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Be on the air tonight, radio fans, and be sure to tune in the Sprott Shaw radiophone. The Sun Radio programme promises to be good this evening, included in the regular programme of news and music there will be a special entertainer with some of the latest songs.
Eric Vale, local entertainer, will sing over the Sprott Shaw Radiophone tonight. At 8 p.m. he will have his voice sent out into the ether, to be picked up by hundreds of amateurs and radio fans in B. C., in a number of the latest comic and popular songs.

SATURDAY, May 6, 1922
SOMETHING GOOD RADIOED NIGHTLY
Reliability of Sun’s Broadcast Pleases Listeners at Bellingham
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Comic numbers by Mr. Eric Vale.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Arthur Watts, well known radio amateur, of Bellingham. Washington, reports to The Vancouver Sun that The Vancouver Sun radio programme comes in extremely well there. An extract from his letter states, "The reliability of your broadcast makes it very nice for us here. Although it is alright too "feel around," in the ether while listening alone, we are always glad to tune The Vancouver Sun in when friends happen along, as we can always be sure of something good at a moment's notice. I wish to thank you for the hours of entertainment you have afforded through the medium of your broadcast."
HEARD 20 FEET AWAY
Still from, another source comes the report that The Vancouver Sun radio programme can be heard exceptionally clear and loud. Leonard Tate, Radio 7 J. S., situated at Anacortes, Washington, writes to The Vancouver Sun, that the music and speech broadcast comes in very loud. He says that the broadcast can be heard 20 feet from the phones on a single tube detector. Such a feat, is greatly to the credit of the efficiency of the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company radiophone.
Comic songs and readings by Eric Vale, accompanied by Victor Nutley, featured The Vancouver Sun radio programme last night. Among them were, “My Coal Black Mammy,” which was featured in Dumb Bells, "Me," a well known comic song; "What Will the Congregation Say; "John Willie, Come on" and several others. The readings were two of Dr. Drummond's well known French-Canadian ballads, "De Stove Pipe ‘Ole" and "Julie Plante."

Image

SUNDAY, May 7, 1922
RADIO LICENSE OFFICE IS OPENED
Government Provides Staff at P. O. to Handle Issue of the Permits
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Comic numbers by Mr. Eric Vale.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
A sensitive receiver is being built for The Sprott Shaw radiophone station. Within the next week it will be installed and in operation. With the new set at the station, inter-city work will be carried on with other broadcasting stations. It is hoped, that prairie cities will be linked up with Vancouver through the medium of the radiophone station. Attempts will be made to work between the various broadcasting stations in Alberta.
There will be no Sun Radio programme today. The concerts and news broadcasts will be resumed Monday at 12:30 p.m. and continue on for the remainder of the week on the regular schedule.
It is not necessary to write to Victoria to obtain licences to use radio apparatus. The Dominion government has opened a branch office here to cope with the Increasing demands for permits. All those wishing to install radiophone receiving outfits may obtain licences In Vancouver by going to Room 46, Post Office building.
User avatar
cart_machine
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 1683
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: The Past

Re: CJCE May 1922

Postby cart_machine » Tue May 03, 2022 5:25 am

Nothing really exciting in the second week of May 1922. The paper gives a playlist for some of its programming days.

MONDAY, May 8, 1922
D’ALVAREZ IS ON RADIO TONIGHT
Records of Famous Contralto of Chicago Opera Company Go Out
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heitzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
Hello! Hello! Hello!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
D'Alvarez, the famous contralto of the Chicago Opera Company, who will appear here In person and will sing with the Men's Musical Club, May 18 at the Empress Theatre, will have a number of her records broadcast tonight, along with the regular Sun Radio Programme.
ROYAL CITY ENJOYS IT
The "Radio" bug has attacked the residents of New Westminster, judging from the numerous aerials strung from the roofs of houses. Several of the well-known radio amateurs of the Royal City state that The Sun Radio Programme has been a source of much enjoyment during the evenings and that the modulation of the voice and music from The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company radiophone Is excellent.
Since the Installation of the new power transformer at the station, there is none of the undesirable noises such as generator "hums," etc., so prevalent with some broadcasting stations.
ISLAND HEARS IT
Reports deceived from Vancouver Island show that The Sun Radio Programme may easily be picked up there. Nanaimo, Victoria and Duncan, three of the places heard from, state that the audibility of the broadcast is very high.
Tonight, the latest releases of Columbia records will feature The Sun Radio Programme.

TUESDAY, May 9, 1922
SCORE OF MUSICAL ITEMS TONIGHT
Amateur Near Portland Much Enjoys “Sun’s” Radio Programme
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
A. Abendroth, radio amateur of Glenwood, Oregon, a town situated 40 miles west of Portland, states that The Sun Radio programme is the source of much enjoyment to him. Mr. Abendroth says that both the voice and music come in extremely loudly at his station and that the modulation of the Sprott Shaw radiophone is far ahead of any other broadcasting stations on the Pacific Coast.
Several prominent radio amateurs of Portland have also been heard from during the past few days. They all say that The Sun Radio programme is one of the best they have heard and that he modulation is perfect.
The following is the musical programme for tonight:
“Cuddle-up Blues” “I’ve Got the Wonder Where Blues” ... Marton Harris
“Jabberwocky” “Na Jo” ....... Happy Six
“Soldiers’ Chorus” “Souvenir de Valence” ........ Buono and McCann
“Polonaise in A Major” “Valse Caprice” ............ Josef Hofmann
“Wabash Blues” “Tuck Me to Sleep” ........ The Columbians
“Comin’ Thro’ the Rye” “John Anderson, My Joe” .......... Mary Garden
“American Patrol” “Call to Arms” .......... Peerless Quartette
“I’d Build a World in the Heart of a Rose” ... Charles Hackett
“She’s a Mean Job” “If You Knew” ..... Frank Westphal and Orchestra
“O Canada” “A Song of Canada” ..... Columbia Mixed Quartette.

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 1922
HOTEL INSTALS RADIO RECEIVER
Manager of Barron Extends Invitation to Public to Hear Sun Broadcast
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Those woh [sic] are not in possession of a radiophone receiving outfit need not necessarily be unable to hear radiophone concerts now. The management of the Barron Hotel has taken advantage of The Sun Radio Programme and installed a radio receiver at the hotel.
The outfit is situated in the lobby and has a loud-speaking attachment which makes it possible for everyone on the ground floor of the hotel to hear the broadcast. An Invitation has been extended to all by the management of the hotel to drop in and hear The Sun Radio Programme.
STROLLERS CAN HEAR
W. D. Wood, Jr., well known among the local radio fans, installed the receiver at the Barron Hotel and states that a more powerful receiver will soon be installed there, so that pedestrians will be able to hear radiophone broadcasts as they pass by.
Not only has the Barron a receiver installed but also Rankin & Cherrill, electrical dealers, have in front of their store loud-speaking apparatus with which to pick up The Sun Radio Programme. Quite a number who were passing by the store between 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. last night, stopped and gathered to hear the fine programme of music broadcast from the Sun Station.
The following is the musical programme for this evening:
“Kashmiri Song” “Mother O’ Mine” ....... Louis Graveure
“Song of India” “To a Wild Rose” ........ Eddie Elkins Orchestra
“Canzonette Op. 6” ...... Toscha Seidel
“Lola Lo” “Doo Dah Blues” ...... Ray Miller and Orchestra
“Don’t Leave Me Mammy” “Indiania Lullabye” .......... Charles Hart
“Colonel Bogey March” “Spirit of Victory March” ......... Columbia Band
“Hilo March” “Kahala March” .. Irene West Royal Hawaiians
“Plantation Lullaby” “Song of Love” ... Prince’s Orchestra
“Souvenir” ...... Duci do Kerekjarto
“Miserere” “Scene and Prayer” ... Columbia Opera Chorus
“Aloha” “Hawaiian Medley” .... Irene West Royal Hawaiians

Thursday, May 11, 1922
K. OF C. TO HEAR RADIO TONIGHT
Arthur Watts of Bellingham Reports Broadcasts Good
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This Is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Arthur Watts again writes to The Sun complimenting on the success of the radio programme. Mr. Watts states that the broadcast is getting better every day and that whenever he wants a sure broadcast to tune in when friends are around, The Sun is the one that answers the purpose, he has extended an invitation to anyone going through Bellingham to drop in at his station and hear The Sun Radio programme.
Tonight the Knights of Columbus, at their regular meeting, will be entertained with a radio concert starting at 8 p.m. The Muir Electric Co. are installing the receiving outfit and special arrangements have been made with The Sun to provide some special music along with their programme.
“The Sheik” “Weep No More” ... Ray Miller and Orchestra
“Barcarolle” “Blue Danube Waltz” .. Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
“Why, Dear?” “When the Sun Goes Down Blues” ... The Happy Six
“California” “An Old Fashioned Girl” ... Knickerbocker Orchestra
“Marcushla” “Killarney” ... Herbert L. Clarke
“Canadian Capers” “Dangerous Blues” ..... Paul Blese Trio
“Sweet Evening Star” .. Pablo Cassals
“Last Waltz” “Peggy O’Neil” .. Prince Dance Orchestra
“Debutante Intermezzo” “The Ladder of Roses” .... Howard Kopp
Records used for broadcasting the musical programme are Columbia and Apex, played on a Classic phonograph by courtesy of local musical dealers.

FRIDAY, May 12, 1922
No column

SATURDAY, May 13, 1922
ANNE LOCHEAD IS RADIO SINGER
Entertainer Is Heard in Programme for Native Sons and Daughters
The Sun radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This in The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
A programme was rendered to The Native Sons and Daughters last evening by way of the radiophone, at their banquet at the Canyon View Hotel, Capilano. They were particularly pleased with the selections rendered by Anne Lochead.
The musical programme for this evening will be made up of all the latest releases of Columbia records which will be on sale shortly and also a number of the latest Apex records.

Sunday, May 14, 1922
RADIO LICENSE OFFICE IS OPENED
Fans May Secure Permits to Operate, at Room 46, P.O. Buiding [sic]
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott Shaw Radio Company.
Frank A. Prichard of Port Stanley, Wash., situated on the San Juan Islands, has written to The Sun to say that at his station he has no trouble in receiving The Sun broadcast. With an amplifier and magnavox the concerts come in loud enough to be audible throughout a large room at his station. He further states that the modulation of a voice and music is much better than most of the others in the Northwest.
Applications for licenses to use radio apparatus may be made in the city. Those who contemplate the installation of a radiophone receiver must have in their possession a license before any apparatus may be installed. Applications may lie had at Room 46, Post Office Building, city.
There will be no Sun Radio Programme this evening.
User avatar
cart_machine
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 1683
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: The Past

Re: CJCE May 1922

Postby cart_machine » Fri May 06, 2022 3:02 am

The Sun station in the third week of May 1922 played both opera records and popular 78s. Evidently a consultant hadn't come in to tell them radio stations don't do that sort of thing.
Pardon any OCR errors. I think I caught most of them.
Note that Seattle has more than one station on the air.
Whoever captioned the photo of Mr. Thote needed spell-check.

Monday, May 15, 1922
SELECTIONS FROM “FAUST” TONIGHT
In Compliance With Many Requests Operatic Gems Will Be Radioed
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m. —Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Programme broadcast by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Many requests have been made at The Sun office asking if more operatic selections could be played during the broadcast.
It has been decided that this will be done and tonight many selections from the opera "Faust" will be put on along with the regular programme. Among them will be "The Soldiers' Chorus," "Die Possente," "Aria Dei Gioelli,” “Sehenata” and others.

Tuesday, May 16, 1922
SUN RADIO HEARD AT PRINCE RUPERT
Wireless Operator on “Venture” Hears Programme Sent Out Here
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
Hello! Hello! Hello! This is The Sun Radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
While docked in the harbor at Prince Rupert, A. R. Thompson, wireless operator of the steamship Venture, on Friday night was able to hear The Sun radio programme. The programme of Friday night included a number of Scotch selections by Miss Ann Lochead, and Mr. Thompson stated that the songs that were rendered by her came through exceptionally well. "Annie Laurie" was wonderful, and the modulation of every note on that selection was perfect, stated Mr. Thompson.
The Sun broadcast has now been heard from Prince Rupert south to Santa Clara, California, and east to Regina. Saskatchewan. This also includes many places between these points such as Port Stanley, Wash.; Cedar Falls, Wash., and Bozeman, Montana. Many of the coasting steamers have also been able to pick up The Sun Radio programme.
One station at Victoria and another at Port Stanley have been able to amplify the broadcast to such an extent so as to make it audible over a large room.

Wednesday, May 17, 1922
RADIO STORES GIVE CONCERTS
The Sun Programme Draws Nightly Crowd to Hear Broadcasts
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
Hello! Hello! Hello! This is The Sun Radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Crowds now gather in front of the leading radio stores of the city each night at 7:30 o’clock to hear The Sun Radio concerts. Amplifying attachments have been fixed on to radiophone receivers in the stores and it is so arranged that the broadcasts may be heard on the street by any who care to stop and listen.
Operators on ships far out at sea, state it is a great relief after hours on watch to be able, at the turn of a dial, pick up radiophone broadcasts which include the latest music and news.

Thursday, May 18, 1922
LA BOHEME TO BE HEARD ON RADIO
Operatic Favorite Will Be a Feature of Programme Tonight
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
Hello! Hello! Hello! This is The Sun Radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Be on the air tonight, radio fans. By special arrangement with the local agents for the Apex records their latest releases will be broadcast tonight. This includes a number of classical numbers as well as several of the latest fox trots and waltzs.
A number of Columbia selections from the opera, "La Boheme," will also feature in the broadcast tonight. Among them will be, "Che Gelida Manina," Mussetta's Waltz and Boheme selections, parts 1 and 2.

Friday, May 19, 1922
RADIO FANS SAY SUN’S IS BEST
Despite Longer Distance Programme Heard Clearer Than Seattle Broadcast
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
Hello! Hello! Hello! This is The Sun Radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
United States radio fans along the Coast of Washington and Oregon say that the Sun Radio programme is by far the best of any broadcast in the Northwest, according to Mr. Thomas of Port Angeles, Washington. Mr. Thomas further says The Sun broadcast comes in much louder and clearer than the Seattle radiophone stations, although the distance is greater from Vancouver than from Seattle. This is undoubtedly due to the fact that The Sun have spared no expense in the erection of the station and that the best apparatus is obtainable has been used.
The radio rage has hit the residents of the Delta and several Ladner people are now daily hearing The Sun broadcast.
Another splendid programme of the latest music has been arranged for this evening's concert along with the regular news and sport reports.

Saturday, May 20, 1922
PARISIAN ARTIST TO RENDER SOLOS
Violin Selections Will Be Broadcast on Sun’s Radio Tonight
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—Violin selections by Maurice Thote.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Maurice Thote, a celebrated violinist of the National Theatre de l’Opera-Comique de Paris, will tonight render several violin solos over The Vancouver Sun radiophone. They will be: "Ave Maria" (Gounod), "Meditation de Thais" (Massenet), and "La Tosca" (Puccini).
Maurice Thote is well known throughout Europe as an orchestra leader and violinist, having played in several of the great playhouses in Germany, Holland and France.
Four hundred and fifty miles from Vancouver, in an isolated district, F. R. Winch at Mill Bay has been provided with excellent entertainment through the medium of The Vancouver Sun radio programme. Mill Bay is situated at the mouth of the Naas [sic] River, where the only connection with the outside world is a weekly mail service. Mr. Winch states that The Vancouver Sun broadcast never fails, and it comes in strong and clear above everything else.

Sunday, May 21, 1922
Hello! Hello! Hello!
This Is The Sun Radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
"Wonderful," were the words of many who reported on the broadcast last evening after Maurice Thote, celebrated French violinist and conductor, had concluded his recital over the radiophone.
Maurice Thote is famous throughout France and Germany as a violinist and orchestra leader. He at one time held the position as orchestra leader at the National Theatre de l’Opera-Comique de Paris, the largest playhouse in Paris.
There will be no Sun Radio Programme today, but as usual the regular daily broadcast will begin again Monday.

Image
User avatar
cart_machine
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 1683
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: The Past

Re: CJCE May 1922

Postby cart_machine » Sat May 07, 2022 4:45 am

Back in the '20s, my father built his own crystal set to pick up the various Vancouver stations (and whatever else was out there). It's natural, then, that the Y.M.C.A. would install a radio at its summer camp just off the little road to the Hopkins Landing wharf.

The Vancouver Sun's station, in the fourth week of May 1922, expanded its broadcast day. This must have been costly as advertisements weren't allowed. The station also demonstrated its programming to beach-goers at English Bay (a "magnavox" was a curved, loudspeaker horn) with live programming. The la-de-da set also enjoyed the station from a radio set at Hycroft in Shaughnessy, arguably Vancouver's most famous mansion that wasn't made into a steakhouse.

This month marked the first instance of transmitter failure that knocked the station off the air for part of a day.

Vancouver's main Orange Hall still exists. It is at the northwest corner of Hastings and Gore.

And it was announced the feds were eliminating a ridiculous policy that allowed only British subjects to own radios. No Americans, no French, no Chinese (Bechuanalanders were okay; they were part of the Empire).

Monday, May 22, 1922
BOYS AT “Y” CAMP TO LISTEN TO RADIO
Receiver and Amplifier Will Be Installed at Hopkins Landing.
The Sun Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420 metre wave length at noon today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Baseball results.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m. —Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph and the records used are Columbia and Apex by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.
Hello! Hello! Hello!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Boys at the Y. M. C. A. summer camp will be entertained with radiophone programmes this season. The Y. M. C. A. has purchased a complete receiver and amplifier. The initial tests will be carried out on next week with The Sun station, when the outfit will be taken to the camp site at Hopkins’ Landing.
Besides the Y. M. C. A. outfit there will be other receivers at the camp, as many of the boys are planning to take along their own outfits.
The Sun broadcasting station will work in with the Y. M. C. A. outfit at the camp and special concerts will be put on for the boys there.

Tuesday, May 23, 1922
Radio Concert for All Is to Be Presented at English Bay Tomorrow
The Sun Radio Programme May Be Heard Free, Without Use of Radio Receiver—Interesting Features Arranged
Thousands may hear simultaneously The Sun Radio Programme during the afternoon of May 24. It they so wish and the best of it is that they won't even need a radiophone receiver.
After receiving requests by the score at The Sun office for a public demonstration of The Sun broadcast, it has been decided to give to the public a radio concert that will cost them nothing. This will take place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on May 24 at English Bay. Through the courtesy of the Military Hands Committee and the Eckart players, it has been arranged to use the open air theatre near the pier as the location for the demonstration.
A sensitive radiophone receiver will be installed in front of the auditorium with a Magnavox attachment, so that all within a radius of over 100 yards will be able to hear the broadcast. Those who wish to stay and hear the complete concert broadcast may do so. The seating facilities, which are very good, will be thrown open to the public and there will be no need for any to stand to hear this wonderful demonstration of the latest and greatest invention of the age.
Requests are being received daily asking for longer broadcasts. The electrical dealers have realized that The Sun radiophone station is the best and most powerful, and they have also asked for an extension. This will be done. From now on The Sun will broadcast from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. a news and concert programme. Again at 3:30 p.m. The Sun will broadcast from their station a concert programme continuing on until 5 p.m.
The evening broadcast will also be made longer. It will begin at 7:30 p.m. and continue on until 10 p.m. and will include, from time to time, selections by the best dance orchestras of the city and numbers by prominent artists
The first night of the extension of the broadcast will be featured by several delightful ballads by Rita De Lue, contralto, and Betty Brown, piano, who are pleasing thousands at the Pantages theatre this week.
Radio has taken the city in its grip and crowds now gather nightly in front of the electrical stores to hear The Sun Radio programme.
Programme For Today
THE SUN Radio programme to be broadcasted by the Sprott Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length today and tonight is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news, market reports and concert numbers.
1:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
3:30 p.m.—News digest and musical programme.
4:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
5:00 p.m.—Final news flashes and market returns.
7:30 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:30 p.m.—Songs by Rita De Lue, accompanied by Betty Brown.
9:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
10:00 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.

Wednesday, May 24, 1922
Don't Forget Sun's Radio Programme at English Bay Today
Receiver Will Be Placed on Stage and Public Will Get Free Concert
THOUSANDS were held spellbound last night when from The Vancouver Sun radiophone station broke forth the opening bars of that old song, “The Sweetest Story Ever Told,” sung by Betty Brown, accompanied by Rita De Lue. They are both from the Pantages, and are delighting hundreds there this week with several old as well as new songs. Followed by the first selection Rita De Lue gave the radio fans a touch of popular music with “The Sheik.” They then concluded their part of the broadcast with that well-known popular song of a few years ago, “Kiss Me Again.”
Don’t forget the public demonstration of The Vancouver Sun radio programme at English Bay today. The Vancouver Sun has been fortunate in securing the use of the open-air theatre next to the pier, through the courtesy of the military bands committee and the Eckart Players.
A radiophone receive with a Magnavox attachment will be placed on the stage, so that all within a radius of 200 yards or more will be able to enjoy a radio concert, even though they have not a radio outfit in their home. The demonstration will take place during the afternoon.
Great was the delight of Pat Reid of New Westminster when he was given a little talk over The Vancouver Sun radiophone last evening. Pat has been bed-ridden for over a year and a half as a result of an accident which injured his back. He has a radiophone receiver, and is deriving a great deal of pleasure from The Vancouver Sun radio concerts.
BROADCAST BIG HIT
The broadcasting of baseball scores has taken well with the United States amateurs, judging by what C.R. Miller of Yacult, Wash., has to say. Mr. Miller states that there is not the slightest tendency for the signals to fade from The Vancouver Sun radiophone, as do the broadcasts from the Seattle radiophone stations. This makes the programmes from The Vancouver Sun station much more enjoyable than those from the other stations.
Programme For Today
THE SUN Radio programme to be broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news, market reports and concert numbers.
1:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
3:30 p.m.—News digest and musical programme.
4:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
5:00 p.m.—Final news flashes and market returns.
7:30 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:30 p.m.—Baseball results.
9:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
10:00 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard-Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.

Thursday, May 25, 1922
First Open-Air Radio Concert Draws Crowds To English Bay Beach
Sun's Programme at Bandstand Is Great Success; Thousands Hear It
VAUDEVILLE ARTISTS PUT ON THEIR ACTS
Orangemen Will Be Entertained by Special Numbers Friday
Thousands yesterday heard the first open air radio concert ever held in the Dominion of Canada.
Crowds flocked to English Bay for the open air demonstration of The Sun Radio programme. The radiophone receiver was set up on the stage of the open air theatre near the pier and within a hair-hour all available space was filled. Many lined the rail of the pier to listen to the music and others crowded along the promenade.
Several acts of vaudeville, arranged for by The Sun, were staged by the Eckart Players, who will tonight render their initial programme for the season at the bay.
Results of the lacrosse match and yacht races were broadcast from the transmitting station to be picked up at the bay and amplified to such an extent that they could be heard by the great throng.
The Orangemen's banquet at the Orange Hall on Friday night will be featured with a radiophone concert. The Sun has arranged to install a receiving outfit, with amplifying apparatus. A special programme will be arranged for the Orangemen, to be broadcast from The Sun transmitting station.
Roy Hutton, radio amateur of Bellingham, Washington, reports that The Sun radio programme is the best of them all. He says that The Sun broadcast is much clearer than any of the others.
Programme For Today
THE SUN Radio programme to be broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news, market reports and concert numbers.
1:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
3:30 p.m.—News digest and musical programme.
4:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
5:00 p.m.—Final news flashes and market returns.
7:30 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:30 p.m.—Baseball results.
9:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
10:00 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.

Saturday, May 27, 1922
Capital Concert to Be Given Tonight by Sun Radiophone
Hello! Hello! Hello!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcasted by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
C. A. Campbell and an orchestra of local talent entertained thousands last night through the medium of The Sun Radiophone broadcasting service, with a number of the latest dance hits of the season.
Not only did those who have radiophone receiving outfits in their homes hear Mr. Campbell and the orchestra, but hundreds of others also listened in on The Sun Radio programme last night. The Sun installed a radiophone receiver at the Orange Hall so that the arrangement at their banquet would have extra entertainment in the form of a radio concert, the latest and most advanced method of entertainment.
Port Stanley, Washington, continues to hear The Sun radio programme. F. A. Pritchard states that at Port Stanley, The Sun broadcast comes in extremely loud, and that with an amplified and Magnavox he has no trouble in giving radio concerts with which to entertain his friends.
A well-featured concert has been arranged for tonight. Arrangements have been made to get the latest sample Columbia records, which will be on sale in the near future. Listen in everybody, as there are some good ones and you will be able to pick out the records you want through the medium of the radio concert.
Programme For Today
THE SUN Radio programme to be broadcasted by The Sprot-Shaw [sic] Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news, market reports and concert numbers.
1:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
3:30 p.m.—News digest and musical programme.
4:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
5:00 p.m.—Final news flashes and market returns.
7:30 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:30 p.m.—Baseball results.
9:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
10:00 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.

Sunday, May 28, 1922
Radiophone Permits Will Be Issued to All B.C. Applicants
Government Extends Privilege to Any Who May Apply; Former Regulation Excluded All But British-born Subjects in Province
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Owing to the fact that The Sun has so much furthered the development of radio during the past few month by efficient broadcasting from one of the highest powered radiophone stations in Canada, arrangements have been made with the department of naval service by by which anyone may own and operate a radiophone receiving outfit. Before, it was necessary to be a British-born subject. This kept thousands from enjoying this entertainment brought forward by The Sun. The new order goes into effect on June 1, and from that time radio receiving licenses will be granted to all applicants.
An extended programme was given the radio fans of B.C. and the northern states last evening. New dance selections were given out for the first time. Many of these selections are not yet on sale, but by special arrangement with the distributor they were broadcast on the radiophone.
Victoria radio fans enjoy The Sun radio programme very much. All over Vancouver Island radio fans take The Sun broadcast as the standard. Several there have “loud-speaking” attachments on their receivers and are able to entertain their friends with concerts.
There will be no broadcast from The Sprott-Shaw station today.

Monday, May 29, 1922
I.O.D.E. Delegates Will Hear “Sun” Radio at Garden Party.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcast by The Sprott-Shaw Radio Company.
Delegates attending the national convention of the I. O. D. E. here this week will hear The Sun radio programme.
The Sun has made arrangements to have installed at “Hycroft,” the residence of Mrs. A. D. McRae, a radiophone receiving outfit and loud talker on Tuesday. Mrs. McRae is holding a grand garden party at her residence that afternoon for the delegates of the national convention of the I. O. D. E., and those attending will be given a demonstration of a radio concert by The Sun. A special programme is being arranged for that afternoon which will be broadcast to the receiving station situated at “Hycroft,” where it will be amplified to such an extent that it may be heard by all attending.
there are now over 450 licensed amateur radio stations in and around Vancouver and probably eight persons who listen in for The Sun radio programme at each station, making a total of 2800 people who, every night, hear The Sun broadcast. This does not include the thousands of radio fans in the United States who are always on the air listening for radiophone broadcasts. Many stations in Oregon, Washington, Montana and California have reported that they have heard The Sun broadcast.
Programme For Today
THE SUN Radio programme to be broadcast by The Sprot-Shaw [sic] Radio Company on a 420-metre wave length today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news, market reports and concert numbers.
1:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
3:30 p.m.—News digest and musical programme.
4:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
5:00 p.m.—Final news flashes and market returns.
7:30 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:30 p.m.—Baseball results.
9:30 p.m.—Concert numbers.
10:00 p.m.—Final news flashes.
Musical selections are played on a Classic phonograph, and the records used are Columbia and Apex, by courtesy of local music houses.
Gerhard Heintzman piano by courtesy of Fletcher Bros. Limited.

Tuesday, May 30, 1922
Programme as Usual Today
THE burning out of one of the powerful oscillating valves crippled The Sun's radio service last night, but arrangements have been made to carry on as usual today, and The Sun will broadcast the programme at "Hycroft," the residence of Mrs. A. D. McRae this afternoon.
Delegates attending the national convention of the I. O. D. E. here this week will hear the Sun radio programme through a radiophone receiving outfit and loud talker at the garden party given by Mrs. McRae for the delegates.

Wednesday, May 31, 1922
I. O. D. E. Delegates Hear Sun's Radiophone Concert
The Sun radio receiving set and loud talker will be set up In the Manufacturers' Building, formerly the Cassidy Block, 927 Granville Street, Thursday, at the official opening of the Manufacturers' permanent exhibition and art gallery of the B. C. Art League.
A concert programme has been arranged and the visitors to this Interesting exhibit of British Columbia's industrial products and works of art will be treated to a feast of music. Thousands are expected to visit the exhibit during the day.
Yesterday's concert of The Sun Radio at the garden party at "Hycroft," the residence of Mrs. A. D. McRae, was heard by delegates attending the I. O. D. E. convention. The programme was carried out without a hitch and the audience voted the entertainment a success.
User avatar
cart_machine
Advanced Member
 
Posts: 1683
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: The Past


Return to Radio Station History

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests