CFYC March 1922

A look back at various radio stations

CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Fri Mar 11, 2022 2:44 am

All three Vancouver daily newspapers put radio stations on the air in March 1922. The last one was CFYC, owned by Victor Odlum, manager of the Vancouver Daily World.

Through circumstances I haven't researched, the license ended up in the hands of the International Bible Students (Jehovah's Witnesses) and operated in Burnaby until it was shut down in 1928.

The World heralded its station on its front page. What seems odd in reading this is the station seemed more a promotion for a company that made radios than anything else (conveniently owned by Odlum). The general brought in Louis Wasmer, an American, who must have been pretty busy that month as he also put KHQ on the air in Seattle in March 1922 (the station moved to Spokane in 1925). Wasmer sold motorcycles and bicycles in Seattle and built several early stations there.

Here are three stories in advance of the first broadcasts. One surprisingly admits there is a second radio station in Vancouver; I suspect it's referring to the Sun's CJCE.

Tuesday, March 21, 1922
FIRST REAL RADIO SERVICE
"WORLD'S" HIGH-POWER STATION READY TO BROADCAST FOR WESTERN CANADA

Receiving Sets for the People Are Now Ready for Distribution Every Home and Office Can Now Enjoy Invention With the Greatest Ease.
Today, The World announces to its readers that it has brought the invention of the age, the radio-telephone, within easy reach of its readers. There is no longer any need of the people of Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo nor, indeed, any part of British Columbia feeling that the wireless telephone is a subject which only students of science may play with.
The radio-telephone is here today as an adjunct to every household. Yesterday we were laughing at the transmission of the human voice without wires. Today we are faced with the practical fact that the radiophone is an instrument which has, within the last few months, been brought to a simplicity which marks one of the greatest steps of human progress into the mystic forces which govern this universe of ours.
From an intricate device, only within the reach of scientists with specially developed apparatus under their control, the radiophone has suddenly become an instrument of practical use by every man, woman and child of the human race.
Without undue self-adulation, The World may say in this first announcement of its radio service, that it realized several weeks ago that its readers would very soon wish to have the radiophone at their disposal and every effort was made to secure the services of experts who could bring the people within the range of the invention with the minimum of effort.
And, today, The World brings this invention to its readers in practical form, no longer a toy, nor a laboratory wonder, but a device of such import that it means the solving of the problem of all apes instantaneous communication between human minds without wires.
So great has been the development of the wireless telephone in other parts of the world during the last few months that the bends of the greatest companies controlling means of communication have turned their sole efforts to the use of it as a substitute to the methods in use for the last decade.
Realizing that it was useless erecting a powerful broadcasting station for the people of British Columbia unless arrangements were made to have radio receiving sets in such supply and in such form that they were as easy to operate us the ordinary telephone. The World management set about getting assured supplies of such receivers. To this end it has entered into association with the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company, Ltd., of which Brigadier-General Victor W. Odlum is the head, and this company has arranged to place its receiving sets at the disposal of World readers.
WORLD'S PLANS MATURED
Here, in brief, are the plans which The World has matured:
The erection of a 250-watt broadcasting station, which will have a radius of 2000 miles, equipped with the very latest devices to bring voices and music distinct in every home in British Columbia, including Vancouver lsland cities;
The disposal through the Trans Canada Radiovox Company, Ltd., of a plentiful supply of its receiving sets in three types No. 1, ready for instant use in all houses, to retail in British Columbia for $25.00. This is what is known as a crystal detector set, capable of receiving very clearly from the World high-power broadcaster within a radius of specially adapted set, for amplifying the receipt of voices, music, etc., so that head telephones are unnecessary this will retail at $55.00; No. 3, specially sensitive receiving equipment with vacuum detecting and amplifying tubes, designed, by the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company for use in mining camps, logging concerns, and other commercial enterprises, where constant and easy communication with the city is desired. These sets vary from $150.00 to $240.00, according to the number of amplifiers attached.
SHORTAGE BOGEY ENDED
The tremendous demand, particularly in the United States, for radio-phone receiving sets has unprecedented in any business in great trouble and expense. The World is able to announce that from tomorrow, a constant and ample supply will be on hand for the people of British Columbia.
It was twenty-one years ago that the world awoke one morning, rubbed its eyes, and learned that the Atlantic Ocean had been bridged without wires. So wireless telegraphy, as a science, is comparatively old. Wireless telephony, however, has been perfected since the world war. Already there are at least 700,000 radio receiving outfits in the United States, of which 40,000 are within a hundred miles of New York City; nine months ago there were less than 50,000 such outfits. There are thirty-five broadcasting stations in eighteen different states. While Canada is almost a virgin field—though in the last few months considerable activity has developed—five new broadcasting stations have secured licences, two of them in this city.
Radio-telephony has made possible the voice contact with an audience of thousands and tens of thousands without the necessity of assembling humanity under one roof. It is pre-eminently a home acquisition, bringing to the fireside of the family circle news, music and other attractions. It is just as easy to buy a radio telephone today as it is to purchase a toothbrush, and it is an equally simple matter to use one.
The Daily World’s broadcast will consist of daily news bulletins, sermons, lectures, vocal and instrumental concerts, operas, market reports, shipping news, weather forecasts, fashion tips, agricultural reports, church services and children’s bedtime stories. There will be something of interest for every member of the family. With the horn attachment, or Loud-a-phone, which is supplied for a nominal sum with the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company's receiving equipment, the entire family may enjoy the programme. Radio-telephone parties will become as popular in Vancouver as they are in Seattle and other cities where the new invention has made such headway in the past few months.
Tomorrow, The World will print its first radio programme. For information of any kind, call Seymour 3714.

Wednesday, March 22, 1922
WORLD'S RADIO READY TO AT 2 TOMORROW
The World's radio broadcasting station is being erected today and will be tested out tonight on a 360-metre wave length. A regular programme is announced for tomorrow, commencing at 2 p.m. The present 360-metre broadcast is a temporary one. Announcement will be made in a day or two in regard to a fixed wave length. Electrical radio engineers are at present testing out and installing the new broadcasting equipment and will determine after a few experiments the most suitable wave length to use here in conjunction with the various sizes of receiving sets supplied by the Trans-Canada Radiovox Co., Ltd.
The programme arranged for The World's radio broadcast tomorrow, on a 360-metre wave length, is as follows:
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Digest of latest world news, including stock reports, and latest Vancouver Stock Exchange transactions. Music specially selected for radio transmission.
3 p.m. to 4 p.m.—Latest stock reports and news bulletins and musical programme.
5 p.m. to 7 p.m.—Latest cable, telegraph and Vancouver news bulletins, with musical programme interspersed for the dinner hour.
8 p.m. to 10 p.m.—The World will broadcast all latest news, give musical items, vocal and instrumental selections and other lumbers.
The company has an unlimited supply of equipment. Any person desiring information of any sort should phone Seymour 3714.

Thursday, March 23, 1922
WORLD'S OWN HIGH POWER RADIO BEGINS BROADCASTING TODAY FROM ITS CENTRAL CITY STATION
Plant Erected on Spencer Building When Thoroughly Tested Last Night Under Supervision of Leading Radiophone Expert Proves One of the Best on the Pacific Coast.

NOW ASSURED OF BEST RESULTS
Flood of Enquiries for Receiving Sets Comes in—Large Mining Companies Operating at Remote Points Beg for Quick Installation of Apparatus.

After strenuous effort and a night of the most thorough tests The World begins its broadcasting service today from its high-power radio station on the Spencer Building. The equipment, which Mr. Louis Wasmer, recognized in the United States as one of the foremost experts in the radiophone business, has personally supervised in its erection and tests, has already proved to be one of the finest on the coast. The World has entered the radio field so thoroughly that the management is positive of the very best results.
The World Office has been flooded with inquiries for the receiving sets for homes and offices supplied by the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company. And, more interesting still is the fact that representatives of the large mining companies and firms having branches in the interior, where telegraph connections are difficult and expensive, have been begging for quick installation of powerful receiving sets to assist communication.
World readers are most interested, of course, in the set for the home. The $25.00 crystal detector receiving set, supplied by The Daily World through the Trans-Canada Radiovox Co., Ltd., is guaranteed to pick up The World broadcast for a radius of fifty miles from Vancouver.
It is sold for $25.00 and includes one hundred feet of copper wire, for the aerial, head telephones, and the necessary government licence.
A description of this set follows, and any person who follows the instructions can set the machine up in a short time with ease.
WORLD'S RADIO BROADCAST
The programme arranged for The World’s radio broadcast today, on a 360-metre wave length, is as follows:
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Digest of latest world news, including stock reports, and latest Vancouver Stock Exchange transactions. Music specially elected for radio transmission.
3 p.m. to 4 p.m.—The latest stock reports and news bulletins and musical programme.
5 p.m. to 7 p.m.—The latest cable, telegraph and Vancouver news bulletins, with musical programme interspersed for the dinner hour.
8 p.m. to 10 p.m.—The World will broadcast all the latest news, give musical items, vocal and instrumental selections and other numbers.

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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Fri Mar 11, 2022 3:19 am

My apologies. I edited the above post and was told by the software I couldn't edit it. Allow me to resubmit it with dropped lines reinserted.
There's also the word "lumbers" in a story above. It should be "numbers."

Tuesday, March 21, 1922
FIRST REAL RADIO SERVICE
"WORLD'S" HIGH-POWER STATION READY TO BROADCAST FOR WESTERN CANADA

Receiving Sets for the People Are Now Ready for Distribution Every Home and Office Can Now Enjoy Invention With the Greatest Ease.
Today, The World announces to its readers that it has brought the invention of the age, the radio-telephone, within easy reach of its readers. There is no longer any need of the people of Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo nor, indeed, any part of British Columbia feeling that the wireless telephone is a subject which only students of science may play with.
The radio-telephone is here today as an adjunct to every household. Yesterday we were laughing at the transmission of the human voice without wires. Today we are faced with the practical fact that the radiophone is an instrument which has, within the last few months, been brought to a simplicity which marks one of the greatest steps of human progress into the mystic forces which govern this universe of ours.
From an intricate device, only within the reach of scientists with specially developed apparatus under their control, the radiophone has suddenly become an instrument of practical use by every man, woman and child of the human race.
Without undue self-adulation, The World may say in this first announcement of its radio service, that it realized several weeks ago that its readers would very soon wish to have the radiophone at their disposal and every effort was made to secure the services of experts who could bring the people within the range of the invention with the minimum of effort.
And, today, The World brings this invention to its readers in practical form, no longer a toy, nor a laboratory wonder, but a device of such import that it means the solving of the problem of all ages—instantaneous communication between human minds without wires.
So great has been the development of the wireless telephone in other parts of the world during the last few months that the heads of the greatest companies controlling means of communication have turned their sole efforts to the use of it as a substitute to the methods in use for the last decade.
Realizing that it was useless erecting a powerful broadcasting station for the people of British Columbia unless arrangements were made to have radio receiving sets in such supply and in such form that they were as easy to operate us the ordinary telephone. The World management set about getting assured supplies of such receivers. To this end it has entered into association with the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company, Ltd., of which Brigadier-General Victor W. Odlum is the head, and this company has arranged to place its receiving sets at the disposal of World readers.
WORLD'S PLANS MATURED
Here, in brief, are the plans which The World has matured:
The erection of a 250-watt broadcasting station, which will have a radius of 2000 miles, equipped with the very latest devices to bring voices and music distinct in every home in British Columbia, including Vancouver lsland cities;
The disposal through the Trans Canada Radiovox Company, Ltd., of a plentiful supply of its receiving sets in three types: No. 1, ready for instant use in all houses, to retail in British Columbia for $25.00. This is what is known as a crystal detector set, capable of receiving very clearly from the World high-power broadcaster within a radius of 150 miles from Vancouver; No. 2, specially adapted set for amplifying the receipt of voices, music, etc., so that head telephones are unnecessary; this will retail at $55.00; No. 3, specially sensitive receiving equipment with vacuum detecting and amplifying tubes, designed by the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company for use in mining camps, logging concerns, and other commercial enterprises, where constant and easy communication with the city is desired. These sets vary from $150.00 to $240.00, according to the number of amplifiers attached.
SHORTAGE BOGEY ENDED
The tremendous demand, particularly in the United States, for radio-phone receiving sets has caused a shortage unprecedented in any business in history, and it was only after great trouble and expense. The World is able to announce that from tomorrow, a constant and ample supply will be on hand for the people of British Columbia.
It was twenty-one years ago that the world awoke one morning, rubbed its eyes, and learned that the Atlantic Ocean had been bridged without wires. So wireless telegraphy, as a science, is comparatively old. Wireless telephony, however, has been perfected since the world war. Already there are at least 700,000 radio receiving outfits in the United States, of which 40,000 are within a hundred miles of New York City; nine months ago there were less than 50,000 such outfits. There are thirty-five broadcasting stations in eighteen different states. While Canada is almost a virgin field—though in the last few months considerable activity has developed—five new broadcasting stations have secured licences, two of them in this city.
Radio-telephony has made possible the voice contact with an audience of thousands and tens of thousands without the necessity of assembling humanity under one roof. It is pre-eminently a home acquisition, bringing to the fireside of the family circle news, music and other attractions. It is just as easy to buy a radio telephone today as it is to purchase a toothbrush, and it is an equally simple matter to use one.
The Daily World’s broadcast will consist of daily news bulletins, sermons, lectures, vocal and instrumental concerts, operas, market reports, shipping news, weather forecasts, fashion tips, agricultural reports, church services and children’s bedtime stories. There will be something of interest for every member of the family. With the horn attachment, or Loud-a-phone, which is supplied for a nominal sum with the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company's receiving equipment, the entire family may enjoy the programme. Radio-telephone parties will become as popular in Vancouver as they are in Seattle and other cities where the new invention has made such headway in the past few months.
Tomorrow, The World will print its first radio programme. For information of any kind, call Seymour 3714.
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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Fri Mar 11, 2022 9:24 am

Here's the World's review of its radio station's first broadcast from its edition of Friday, March 24, 1922. Surprise! It's a rave.

I'm afraid I can't tell you who the first announcer/operator, Jack Wilson, was. There are too many John Wilsons (no Jacks) in the City Directory. There's one who was a clerk at Spencer's, so that could be him.

I imagine there has not been a house at 615 Nelson for quite some time. It's just up from Seymour, next to where the old billiard hall was on the corner a number of years ago.

The OCR errors have been corrected, I hope.

WORLD'S FIRST RADIO BROADCAST BRILLIANTLY SUCCESSFUL DECLARE HEARERS AT FAR DISTANT POINTS
Telephones Kept Busy Receiving Congratulations of Listeners-in on Wonderful Clearness With Which Programme of News and Music Was Heard

PICKED UP AWAY OUT AT SEA
Steamer Venture Listens-in When One Hundred Miles Away—Hockey Results Told as Fast as Plays Were Made—Commons Report Delivered

"Got it clear as a bell." "Your modulation was wonderful." "Greatest we have ever picked up yet." "Don't stop; keep it up; it's wonderful." B-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r went the telephone bells in The World office Thursday night, and seven special operators at as many different telephones were kept busy answering them and replying to the different radio fans who listened-in to the first of The World's radio broadcast, which was sent out on Thursday afternoon and evening.
As soon as the steamer Venture tied up last evening her radio operator hurried to a telephone to report to The World that 100 miles up coast, during the afternoon, he had been listening to the news broadcasted by this newspaper. He was only one of many. From New Westminster several calls were received, and from 615 Nelson street, where 16-year-old Cyril Bellington has installed a home-made radio set, “Dad” rang in to say that while the amateur radiographer was out “Father had listened-in and it was the clearest and best ever.”
"The greatest we have had since the set was installed," said Mr. Bellington, and a few seconds later the operator at Radio Station 5DD, on 49th Avenue, made a similar report.
"It couldn't be better," he said. "I'm using stuff I was ready to throw away, thinking It wasn't good enough, and I can hear you all over the room."
F. J. Marshall, of 1665 Twelfth Avenue West, rang in to say "Great results. Can't believe it possible, but I'm right here with my own set and I know it must be true. Keep it up."
Radio station 5, on Broadway, was equally enthusiastic, while Bennett Lazarus, of 1320 Pendrill street, who was also operating a home-made set, rang in to say that while he had at first received the broadcast only in spasms, a further tuning up of his instrument had resulted in getting perfect modulation.
N. A. Good, of 1016 Dublin Street, New Westminster, heard everything perfectly. "I heard you put in the call for my friend, Peck," he said. "I'm about 14 miles away from you and I'm working with a set I manufactured myself. The only things I bought were the detector tubes, and I get you perfectly."
Without any special apparatus the wireless operator on the liner Empress of Russia picked up The World radiophone concert on Thursday afternoon on her way to Victoria. The operator was so interested that he called many officers, passengers and officials of the company to hear the concert. Mr. J. J. Forster, general passenger agent of the company, says that every sound could be heard as clear as a bell.
"I don't wonder that people are beginning to show much interest in the radiophone," Mr. Forster told The World. "It certainly is wonderful. Why, I was simply amazed at the clearness. I am now a dyed-in-the-wool radio fan."
Mr. Forster says the song by "Alma Gluck, the famous Irish tenor," as the wireless operator announced, was greatly enjoyed as was the news disseminated by The World radiophone.
And up on the roof of the Spencer Building, Louis Wasmer, manufacturer of the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company radiotelephone equipment, who supplied and erected the transmission set supplied to The World, turned to Jack Wilson, world war veteran and expert radio operator, and said "She's just as good as I thought she would be."
All night long with a crew of sweating erectors these two had worked. From the time the big store closed on Wednesday night until day broke they had been busy, and then after a hurried breakfast they were back on the job again in the forenoon testing out the set for the first broadcasting at 2 p. m. Hollow-eyed from lack of sleep they kept at work, and at ten minutes to two reported that the final test had been made and the big set was ready to give the news of the world to The World's radio fans.
A special telephone had been run to the roof of the big department store for the use of the radio men. As soon as the first announcement was made it was picked up in The World office and In the offices of the Trans-Canada Press In the Standard Bank Building, and immediately word was telephoned to the Spencer store. Using only the small crystal detector sets remarkable results were secured In both places, and when after a request had been broadcasted to the amateur radio operators asking them to report results to The World the broadcasting was topped for fifteen minutes, the telephones began to ring and from all over the city reports came pouring in.
"It is one of the best jobs I have ever installed," said Louis Wasner. "Everything has gone without a hitch and the results cannot be surpassed." It was the same all during the afternoon and evening. From 1 p. m., when the first news was sent out, until 10 p. m., when the last instrumental selection was played, there was no fault to be found, and radio fans in Vancouver were unanimous in stating that it was the finest broadcasting they had ever heard.
Cable news from England; results of the hockey match; late news of the impending coal strike; doing of the House of Common at Ottawa; latest stock reports and vocal and instrumental numbers were all given, and so perfect was the transmitting set that not one complaint was received firm the radio operators who were listening in.
And that is only with a temporary 10-watt transmitting station. In from 10 to 14 days the big new 250-watt radio telephone transmitter will be installed, and The Worid will then have the largest radio concert transmitting station on the Pacific Coast, capable of sending out news to every point on the Pacific Coast, up into the prairies and even to far-away Alaska.
"The set in operation now is a highly efficient 10-watt station, and judging from the reports coming in tonight it is the most efficient set in the city," said Wasmer, "but wait until I install the big set. Then radio fans 50 and 60 miles away will be able to pick us up on the simplest of sets. The crystal detector set will work perfectly at that distance and further, although with the 10-watt station we are receiving very good reports from people with small sets at about 15 and 20 miles. With the 250-watt transmitter we can reach any point in the province or in Western Canada or the United States."
At the present time The World radio man is operating on a 360-metre wave length, and radio operators should bear this in mind when tuning up for The World’s daily broadcast.
And very shortly each home in Vancouver will have its own radio set, just as it has its own telephone. The radiotelephone has come to stay. There is no denying this fact. In Seattle one newspaper alone installed over 25,000 machines. It isn’t a bad; it is a necessity, and big business interests and live business men all over the continent are finding out that not only do can they not do without it themselves, but that people generally want it. It is a godsend to the people in the country and in out-of-the-way places, and it is equally a boon to city dwellers.
As an instance of the way it is catching on in Vancouver, it might be cited that several big department stores are installing radiotelephone departments. At Spencers, Ltd., a special department was opened today. This morning the first inside aerial in the city was installed on the first floor of the mammoth store, and at 2 o'clock this afternoon The World's radio broadcast will be heard there, while orders will be taken for receiving sets there and at 1416 Standard Bank Building, at the Radiovox offices.
At the automobile show a special set is being installed, and visitors to the show will hear The World's broadcast, while in the evening a special programme is being arranged for the smoker of the Imperial Veterans in Canada. At this smoker members of the Veterans' Association will give selections over The World's radiotelephone, and in addition all the latest Old Country cables will be sent right into the clubroom where the smoker is being held.
Allen Orchestra Concert.
Arrangements have also been made for the Allen orchestra to give a concert when the new 250 watt transmitting set is installed, while other attractions will be arranged from time to time as celebrated artists and other celebrities visit Vancouver.
Today another programme will be sent out by The World. This will consist of stock reports, news bulletins, musical items vocal and instrumental, late cables and other items of interest. All that any possessor of a receiving set has to do to receive The World's radio broadcast is to set his wave length at 360 metres and listen in, and from the high powered station on the high roof of the Spencer building he will receive all the latest news and a free concert as well. Radio Operator Jack Wilson, who was in the radio service during the world war and who has also worked on radio sets from Mexico to Alaska and from the Pacific to the Atlantic, is in charge of the broadcasting and when his "Hello, Radio Fans! This Is The World's radio broadcast operating from the roof of Spencer's store," is heard, it is time to take a final look at the tuning switch to see that the wave length is set for 360 metres and to "listen in."
WORLD'S RADIO BROADCAST
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Digest of latest world news, including stock reports and latest Vancouver Stock Exchange transactions; music specially selected for radio transmission.
3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.—Special concert for visitors to the Automobile Show at the Arena. News bulletins and stock flashes.
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.—The World's dinner-time radio concert, interspersed with all late news and sport results.
8 p.m. to 10 p.m.--In honor of the visit of Mme. Galli-Curci, The World's broadcast for the evening will include the best items that this great singer has recorded.
A specially selected concert will be sent out from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. for the benefit of the Imperial Veterans of Canada, who are holding a club gathering is the association rooms at 437 Hastings Street West.

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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Mon Mar 14, 2022 2:22 am

One of the things I've discovered reading the stories of early (1922) radio stations both here and in Los Angeles is the sense of wonder people had about radio. The idea of someone speaking the latest news into their homes was astounding.
Here's the front page story in the Vancouver World from March 25, 1922 about its station's second day of broadcasting. I suspect announcer Jack Wilson over-enunciated the words quoted below for clarity's sake; I've heard a late '20s aircheck from the States where the announcer does it. Even in the early '30s, announcers like John Reed King, Alois Havrilla and Ken Roberts had very precise diction.
I haven't a clue who singer "Gerald Teeporten" was.
The Seattle P-I had its own station, KFC, which didn't even last into 1923. It doesn't appear any of the Vancouver stations had call-letters yet.
Bed-spring antennas were not uncommon back then.
I wonder if "fanette" was a local writer's concoction.
Pardon any uncorrected OCR errors.

VICTORIA HEARS NEWS OF MINUTE BY WORLD RADIO
Another Great Success Scored Last Night by High-Powered Set Established by This Newspaper on Top of Spencer Building
CONGRATULATIONS POUR IN
Recipients of Service to Number of 450 Call Up, Testifying to Clearness and Excellent Modulation of Announcements Transmitted
"Radio listeners, attention-n-n. This-is-The-World-radio-broadcast. Operated-by-the-Trans-Canada-Radiovox-Company-from-the-roof-of-the-David-Spencer-Building-Vancouver." Promptly at 2 o'clock on Friday afternoon Jack Wilson, world war radio expert, clamped the headpieces of the big high-powered radio set to his ears, and with Louis Wasmer standing by began the second day of The World's radio broadcast. Before newsboys had arrived at their stations with the early city edition Wilson and Wasmer were broadcasting the news of the world from the special bulletins provided the radio station from this paper. Local news of the automobile show; the cancellations of the fashion show; the sensational action in the Merchants Bank case; stock reports giving the forenoon market; news from Ottawa and cables from Europe were all broadcasted, and the radio fans of Vancouver hardly waited for the finish of the first schedule before they started to ring in and report how well they had received the radio news.
The some reports [sic] of clearness and excellent modulation came in from all sides. It is estimated that 450 calls were received at The World office and the office of the Transcanada Radiovox Canada in the Standard Bank Building on Friday. Everybody seems to be getting The World broadcast. Reports from Victoria stated that at a government station there The World broadcast of Friday was the clearest that had ever been heard on that particular set, and from New Westminster the same reports came in, while ships at sea wirelessed back to the Transcanada offices stating that the concert had been caught in its entirety.
"There is no doubt about it," after listening in on three different sets.
“The World’s sending set is the most efficient in the city, and the results being obtained fully justify the confidence of the people who say that the radiotelephone has come to stay. It will only be a short time before every house In Vancouver is equipped with a receiving set."
And judging from the interest manifested in the installation of a portable set on the first floor of the Spencer store on Friday afternoon, Vancouver will take up the radiotelephone as it has never taken up any previous innovation. So dense was the crowd around the instrument that the erectors were forced to suspend operations time after time, and finally the work was left over until after the store closed. Man, women and children crowded around the amplifying horn, keenly watching all the work of installation.
"They asked a million questions," said Louis Wasmer. "It wasn't any good trying to work. They wanted to know all about the set, and they were not going to be rebuffed. It was a case of chasing them all away or of knocking off work until the store closed, and there were too many too chase away, so we just quit."
Larger Installation Under Way.
But last night the portable set was installed and the final tests made, and today when the various radio fans are receiving The World schedules, shoppers in the David Spencer building will also receive the radioed news. Arrangements are also being made to install a second set in the tea room on the top floor of the building, and patrons of that establishment will not only have music with their meals, but they will receive the latest news hot from the wires when The World's radio set is operating.
The portable sets also mean that patients in hospital can be given concerts by wireless, and lying in bed they can follow the news of the world as it comes from the wires.
Already preparations are being made for the installation of the big 250 watt set which will be the permanent sending set of The World. On the top of the David Spencer building a small army of store attaches is at work erecting the building which will house the new set. The structure will be specially designed to give the best results when orchestras or artists are performing, and as soon as it is completed and the new set installed, The World will have the best concert radio transmitting set on the Pacific Coast, and will be enabled to give concerts to every radio fan in British Columbia and the surrounding states and provinces.
On Friday the listening in radio operators in Vancouver and vicinity heard Gerald Teeporten sing several selections, and the reports from the various stations were flattering in the extreme.
"Give us some more. We get that better than anything so far and that bird surely can warble," came in over the telephone from New Westminster, where an irrespressible [sic] fan was getting "the best results I've ever had and I've been experimenting for three years."
From all over the province requests for receiving sets have been coming in, and word from the Transcanada Radiovox Company is that they will be able to take care of everyone.
"We will have crews working overtime at the factories." said Wasmer on Friday night, previous to his departure for Seattle where he is to superintend the construction of the big transmitting set for The World. "We can turn them out at the rate of one to two thousand a week when we get full crews working, and advance orders show us that we will have to cope with the demand."
Another Programme Today.
Today another big programme will be given starting at 3 p.m., and on Saturday next, radio fans listening in at 11:15 a.m. will have the opportunity of hearing Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre, marshal of France, hero of the Marne and savior of Paris, for Marshal Joffre is to talk over the radiophone from the roof of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and he will give a special message to Vancouver World radio fans telling why it is impossible for him to visit Vancouver at the present time.
The World's radio broadcast is here to stay. It has been a success from the start, and when the new high powered set is installed it will be a still greater success. And everybody can listen in. All you have to do is to set your receiving set for the 360-metre wave length, and wait for Operator Jack Wilson's "Radio listeners A-T-T-E-N-T-I-O-N." Promptly at 2 o'clock it will be heard daily, and then radio fans and fanettes, for the new innovation has captured the ladles also, can get all the late news, hear all the latest songs and instrumental selections, and even the latest jokes from the vaudeville stage "pulled" by the vaudevillians themselves, for The World is arranging several programmes on which visiting artists will appear.
Get your receiving set and listen for Wilson's "This is the Vancouver Daily World's radio broadcast, operated by the Transcanada Radiovox Company, from the roof of the David Spencer building, Vancouver." You will be able to pick it up every day from 2 p.m. until 10 p.m., and you will get all the news direct from the wire.

World's Best Yet Given.

NEW WESTMINSTER, March 25.—Mr. John Peck, who has one of the finest radio sets in the province, and who has made a study of wireless and wireless operations for a number of years past, stated last evening that The World radio service was the best that had as yet been given. The first night was not so good, although it was by no means too bad, but last night the operators seemed to have overcome all the initial difficulties, with the result that the service would require a lot of beating. It was undoubtedly the best. Mr. Peck has his apparatus to fixed that it is possible to sit in comfort and listen just as one would to a very superior Victrola. He has also experimented successfully with an apparatus attached to his bed spring. There is at least one invalid boy in the city to whom the radio messages will be a source of delight. He has been confined to his bed for a couple of years and has still to be there for another two years. His brother was making inquiries yesterday to connection with radio matters, and it is proposed to give him the pleasure of a set in his bedroom so that he can hear all the news and new music every evening.

WORLDS RADIO BROADCAST
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Digest of latest world news, including stock reports and latest Vancouver Stock Exchange transactions; music specially selected for radio transmission.
3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.—Special concert. News bulletins and stock flashes.
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.—The World's dinner-time radio concert, interspersed with all late news and sports results.
8 p.m. to 10 p.m.—In honor of the visit of Mme. Galli-Curci, The World's broadcast for the evening will include the best items that this great singer has recorded.
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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Mon Mar 14, 2022 3:49 am

Continuing our stories about the Vancouver World's station, later known as CFYC, from its first week on the air. This one consists mainly of DX reports from ham operators and others, and the pending arrival of its whopping 250-watt transmitter.

Monday, March 27, 1922
MANY GUESTS ENJOY WORLD PROGRAMME AT RADIO PARTIES
HOW RADIO MESSAGES ARE SENT
"Hello, Arthur Watts—Hello, Arthur Watts of Bellingham. Are you the Watt that put the watt in killowatt?"
Hundreds of radio fans heard Operator Wilson of The World broadcast station, "kidding" Arthur Watts of Bellingham on Saturday. In Bellingham Watts himself joined in the laughter that followed Wilson's query, for he was one of a group gathered around the receiving set he has installed In his home and on which he was receiving The World's radio broadcast on Saturday afternoon and evening.
"We got you perfectly," he wired the Transcanada Radiovox people. "It was very clear and strong and every item was enjoyed by my guests and myself."
And in and around Vancouver hundreds of fans and their friend were again entertained by The World's radio news and concert. On the main floor of the Spencer store on Saturday afternoon crowds thronged around the portable receiving set installed there. In spite of the noise and bustle of the Saturday shopping crowd the concert and radiograms were heard distinctly," although only one of the smaller sets was in use.
G. S. Armstrong of radio station 5 G. L. telephoned in to The World to report that the concert was "extra good."
"I am receiving perfectly," he said. "Every number comes through clear as a bell. It is extra good."
E. Bayliss of Victoria, B.C., also reported in, saying that the modulation was excellent and that he was experiencing no difficulty in catching everything, while Bennett Lazarus, who was one of the first fans to pick up The World's initial broadcast, reported that Saturday night was the best night of all.
"I am getting you better than ever," he said. "Keep it up." Operators at stations 5 D.O. and 5 E.B. were two more enthusiasts, while Mr. Periard of 1142 Davie street and A. E. Evans of 3317 Fleming street, held radio parties and not only listened in themselves, but gave their friends an enjoyable hour or two.
Judging from the hundreds of inquiries that are being received, the ranks of the radio enthusiasts will be swelled appreciably during the next few weeks. Orders for several hundred receiving sets have already been booked by the Transcanada Radiovox Company, and Inventor Louis Wasmer already has gone to Seattle to speed up production. It is expected that deliveries of the various sets will be made almost immediately.
“Arrange double shifts and earmark production for Vancouver,” was the message Wasmer sent to Seattle before he left on Saturday, and then followed the message itself in order to take personal charge of the work. "A radiotelephone receiving set in every home in Vancouver" is his aim. Already he has placed over 25,000 in Seattle and the demand there is increasing. But before he fills any more Seattle orders Wasmer will look after those Vancouver fans who have already placed their orders with the David Spencer Company or the Trans-Canada Radiovox Company.
New Set for The World
While away he will also supervise the making of the high-powered transmission set which is to be installed on the roof of the David Spencer store for The World’s broadcasting station. This set is to be a specially built 250-watt set, and will be the best transmission set on the coast. It will be installed In a specially built auditorium, with sounding boards built into one end, and with sufficient accommodation to allow of orchestras and other large sized organizations giving performances there, while the set itself will be capable of sending The World broadcast to any point on the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Alaska and to Winnipeg.
That the motion picture interests in British Columbia realize the possibilities of the radio is shown from the fact that many of the theatre men are making arrangements at points out side Vancouver to instal receiving sets inside their theatres, and for an hour each evening they will receive the latest news bulletins and transmit them to their patrons, who will thus get the news of the day from twelve to fifty-six hours sooner than they would if compelled to wait for the arrival of the Vancouver papers.
Several of the motion picture men attended the Saturday schedules as guests of The World, and heard the hockey results and other news sent out. Some of the picture men sent personal messages to friends whom they knew were listening in, and when they returned to their offices they telephoned back to Operator Wilson to say that their friends had rung in to say they had received the messages perfectly.
Another Broadcast Today.
Today another broadcast will be sent, starting in at 2 o'clock, and radio fans are instructed to "listen in" at that hour for Operator Wilson's preliminary warning of “Radio fans-at-tentlon-n-n-n-n. This Is the Vancouver Dally World's radio broadcast, operated by the Transcanada Radivox [sic] Company, from the roof of the David Spencer building, Vancouver," and then to set their Instruments for the 360 metre wave length and get the full schedules.
And those who have not yet installed sets are again informed that anyone may do so. You can build one yourself or get one through the David Spencer Company off the Transcanada Radiovox Company. There is no government law against listening in on the numerous messages that are filling the air day and night. Radio messages are common property. They cannot be made exclusive or private. Anyone with the necessary receiving equipment can hear them, and radio fans are increasing by thousand daily. Radio is here to stay and the time to take up this fascinating art is now. Telephone the Transcanada Radiovox Company and join the ever growing army of The World's radio broadcast listeners.

WORLD’S RADIO BROADCAST
All the C. P. R. boats plying up and down the coast, as well as the transpacific liners are "listening in" to The World's daily radio broadcast, according to officials of the marine department of the company.
Today another big programme will be sent out by Operator Wilson on the 360-metre wave length, commencing at 2 p.m.
The programme in full follows:
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Latest developments in Irish situation; latest stock quotations and reports from Vancouver Stock Exchange; specially requested musical numbers; digest of latest world news.
3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.—Latest reports from House of Commons at Ottawa; news bulletins and stork flashes; special afternoon concert.
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.—The World's dinner time radio concert, including numbers by Galli-Curci; late news flashes.
8 p.m. to 10 p.m.—Concert of instrumental and vocal numbers from specially selected records made for radio transmission.

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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Tue Mar 15, 2022 11:36 pm

More on the Vancouver World station.
360 metres was the standard entertainment radio frequency in the US and stations in cities would have to figure out the times when they could go on the air while sharing it. Seattle's KFC was airing on that frequency during the evenings but the World, not surprisingly, makes no mention of interference, perhaps because the wattage was so small.

Tuesday, March 28, 1922
WORLD RADIO AS MUCH FUN ACROSS GULF AS HERE
"Thanks for the entertainment. I picked you up perfectly last night with my Grebe C. R. 8 set. Your announcements were very distinct, and your repeated calls for Mr. Mansfield would seem to come from the next room. Alma Gluck's "Virginny" was sweet and clear, although my C. R. 8 set does not have the amplifiers or loud speaker attachments."
Back again with another boost comes Arthur Watts, of Bellingham, in the above letter, received in Vancouver on Monday night. Ever since the first radio broadcast was sent out by The World this radio fan has been "listening-in" to The World's concerts and radiograms, and he has been giving nightly concerts to his friends.
Leslie Mawhinney, of Victoria, nephew of Editor B. C. Nicholas, of the Victoria Times, also reports that The World's radio broadcast was heard very distinctly In Victoria, and several sets are being installed in the Capital City that will be tuned up with the 360-metre wave length of the high-powered transmitting set on the roof of the David Spencer building.
And local fans are getting just as big a "kick" out of The World broadcast as the out-of-town radio amateurs.
"After listening to your radio-telephone concert this evening I feel compelled to write you a few lines to tell you of the high esteem with which I hold you in your new enterprise," writes Arnold M. Periard, of 1142 Davie Street. Mr. Periard has been "listening-in" on several stations for some time, but he says The World leads them all.
"Lately I have listened to several radio stations, but none to come up to yours," he says in his letter. "The modulation is perfect and could hardly be improved upon, both in regard to the speaking voice and to music. I wish you the greatest success for The World broadcasting station."
E. Bayliss, writing from 1087 Pendergast Street, Victoria, also adds his appreciation.
"I am receiving your splendid radio concerts in fine style," he says. "They are even better than those I get tuned in from San Francisco and other parts of the States. It is certainly a treat to sit down and listen to your fine music.”
Mr. Bayliss is used a De Forest regenerative set and two stage amplifiers, and is more than pleased with results.
"It is all in the tuning up and transmitting," said one expert fan on Monday night. "The World Station seems to be just right, and the experts who are in charge certainly know their business. The results we have been getting are such that it seems hardly creditable that the highest powered station in existence is not sending out the radios. You can pick them up on the smallest and most inexpensive sets, and they are clear and distinct all the time. We are lucky to have such a station, and I look for it to lead them all on the Pacific Coast when the big 250 watt transmission set is installed."
"From all over the province come similar messages lauding The World for the new service. Fans from every point in the interior ore [sic] interested and are installing sets.
Writing on behalf of several helpless cases at the Central Private hospital on Fernwood Road, Victoria, Terry C. Thomson sends in his congratulations.
Others who have written are A. Bedford of Salmon Arm; H. P. Weaver of Chase, B. C.; M. Mc Phail of Armstrong; B. Collison of Abbotsford; W. E. Carsley of Fernie; W. J. Windebank of Mission City; Percy Wish of Spence's Bridge; R. Grist of Matsqui; David Bryden of Coalmont; William Low of Nanaimo; Thomas George of Hammond; "Dinty" W. W. Moore of White Rock, and Postmaster T. E. L. Taylor of Revelstoke.
All these fans either are already receiving The World radio broadcast or are making arrangements to install sets so that they can join the hundreds of radio fans up and down the coast who are already enjoying the nightly concerts and news bulletin services.
Business concerns are also seeking the value of the new service, and the Columbia River Lumber Company, of Golden, together with several mining and fishing companies who have outlying properties and canneries, has sent in inquiries regarding the installation of the receiving sets.
Sets Are Arriving in Vancouver.
The receiving sets are arriving. On Monday word was received that 300 sets had been shipped by express to Vancouver. Inventor Louis Wasmer, who made a special trip to Seattle to superintend the manufacture and shipping of the Vancouver quota of instruments, is a quick worker. He arrived at Seattle on Sunday night, and on Monday morning had hustled the first shipment through. Today they will be passed through the customs and they will then be available for distribution from the David Spencer stores and through the Transcanada Radiovox Company. That means that within the next few days there will be 300 more radio fans in British Columbia, for orders for the sets are still pouring in, and Wasmer has promised that he will keep up his shipments every day until everyone is satisfied.
Mr. Wasmer is also superintending the construction of the big 250 watt set which is to be the permanent transmission set for The World station, and as soon as this is completed he will himself bring it to Vancouver for Installation. He is out to give The World the best station on the Pacific coast and as the foremost radio expert in that territory, and one of the most successful inventors in the radio world today there is no doubt whatever that he will realize his ambition.
Will Continue Broadcast.
In the meantime, The World will still send out a daily radio broadcast of up-to-the-minute news and musical and instrumental selections. Today another broadcast will be sent out, commencing at 2 p.m, and tonight bulletins of the hockey game which is to decide the championship of the world will be sent out as fast as they are received over the special wire installed in the office of The World.
So Radio Fans, Attention! Set your receiving set on the 360 metre wave length of The World's radio broadcast, tune up and "listen in" for Operator Wilson's calls, and for the clearest and best radio concert along the Pacific Coast, according to the radio fans who have already been receiving them.
Technical School Has Fine Set.
One of the biggest steps forward in wireless work In the city has been made by the pupils attending the Vancouver Technical school. Shortly before Christmas a permit was secured and a Marconi half k.w. wireless set installed. The aerials on the roof are three in number and measure 120 feet each.
Most of the credit for the work in connection with the set must go to Messrs. H. A. Jones and A. D. Hotchkiss of the teaching staff and James Crockett and Gerald Newmarsh, students taking the technical course. These four have spent many long hours, the majority of them after school hours, in putting the set in condition, and today it is one of the most up-to-date in British Columbia.
Mr. J. G. Lister, principal of the school, stated that the set was installed with the object of getting in communication with a set to be established in one of the high schools in the city. So far the boys have been sending no messages but have contented themselves with listening to others and enjoying the radiophone service.
"The World service is the best we have heard yet. It is very clear and the selection of news and orchestral pieces are very fine," several of the boys stated.
Students Are Enthusiastic.
Instruction in wireless is not on the regular course of the Technical School, but Mr. Lister had the set installed for the use of those students who were sufficiently enthusiastic to remain after school hours and take up the course. A larger number of them availed themselves of this opportunity and their studies have already borne fruit.
Under the supervision of their teachers they have made a complete set and every afternoon spend several hours in enjoying the radiophone service. The set is made along similar lines to those sold in the stores. There are still several points to be fixed before the set is perfect and the roll reduced, but yesterday afternoon they listened to the messages without the aid of detectors and heard very clearly.

WORLD'S RADIO BROADCAST

Tonight another innovation makes its appearance in The World's Radio broadcast. This is the Children's Bedtime Story, which will be broadcasted at 8:10 p.m. tonight and nightly hereafter. The story will be spoken slowly and distinctly, so that youngsters listening in can hear without any trouble.
In additon [sic] bulletins of the world's championship hockey game will be bulletined as fast as they are received.
The regular programme and schedules are as follows:
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Latest cable news from abroad giving latest developments in Old Country labor disputes and the Irish situation. Morning's stock quotations from Vancouver and New York stock exchanges. Special musical programme.
3:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.—Latest reports from House of Commons at Ottawa. News bulletins and stock flashes. Musical numbers.
5:30 to 7 p.m.—The World's radio dinner time concert, including numbers by Caruso and Galli Curci. Late news flashes and bulletins of hockey game.
8.10 p.m.—The Children's Bedtime Story.
8:10 p.m. to 10 p.m.—Special concert of musical numbers specially requested by The World's radio fans. Final hockey results and other news bulletins received over special wire.
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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Tue Mar 15, 2022 11:45 pm

What stax of wax were jocks playing in Vancouver in 1922?
Everything from opera to ragtime. Evidently, consultants and focus groups were not around to limit the playlist. I wonder when Alma Gluck was last heard on Vancouver radio.
This is from the Vancouver World newspaper station. No call letters yet. I like how they include the disc numbers.

Wednesday, March 29, 1922
FIRST PUBLIC RADIO CONCERT ARRANGED FOR FRIDAY NIGHT
And now comes the first public radio concert in Vancouver. On Friday, March 31, pupils of the Strathcona School will give a concert in the First Presbyterian Church, starting at 8 p.m. and continuing until 10 p.m. The various numbers, including speeches by members of the teaching staff and other prominent educationalists will be sent out over The World's radio broadcasting station from the roof of the David Spencer building.
It will be the first real opportunity for many residents of the city to see the possibilities of radio, for under the supervision of the Transcanada Radiovox Company a three-step amplifier receiving set, with booster magnivox especially constructed for concert work will be installed In the church, and, according to those who have charge of the work it will be possible for those in the rear of the big edifice to hear just as well as those who are close up to the receiving set.
It is to be the first real public test of radio in Vancouver, and in addition to the various numbers of the programme, those in attendance will receive a practical talk on radio by Operator Jack Wilson, the expert in charge of The World's broadcasting station. The talk will be given over the machine itself, and will deal fully with radio-telephony.
That the pupils of Strathcona school are in deadly earnest in their endeavors to take up radio can be gauged by the fact that, under the leadership of several of the teachers they have arranged a full programme for the concert. Their admission fee to the general public will be 25 cents, and it is the intention to take the proceeds of the concert and devote them to the purchase of a special receiving set which will be installed in the school for the use of the various classes.
On Tuesday The World radio broadcast was again received by all the amateur radio fans who were tuned up to the 360 metre wave length. Radio operators from the Princess Victoria, the Adelaide, the Patricia and other vessels of the C. P. R. fleet, also received the news bulletins and concert numbers, while in Port Angeles radio fans at the home of A. L. Phillips not only caught every number distinctly, but staged a dance to the music played in Vancouver.
"Modulation and time perfect," wired Mr. Phillips in reporting in after the concert. "We are getting you better than any of the stations transmitting on this side."
Seattle also reported hearing The World on Tuesday night, Louis Wasmer picking up the broadcast from The World station without any difficulty. As on previous nights, bulletins of the latest news, results of the world's championship hockey match, market quotations and special musical numbers were broadcasted, while at 8.10 Operator Wilson asked for the kiddies and plugged in with one of Burgess' bed-time stories entitled "Farmer Brown's Boy Misses Things."
Fine Musical Programme.
The musical programme was enriched by several special numbers on Star-Gennett records which had been chosen for their fine effects and the manner in which they lend themselves to transmission over the radio.
Included in these numbers was the stirring "Grande Overture of 1812." parts 1 and 2, by His Majesty's Scots Guards Band, which is one of the finest numbers yet sent out over The World's radio.
Other Starr-Gennett records which were very favorably commented on by the radio listeners after the concert, were "Because," by Philip Carson; "At Dawning," by Henry Moeller; "Eddie Leonard Blues," by Irving Kaufman; "Dear Old Southland" bv Vernon Talhart; "Angel Child," by Hazsy Natzy and his Biltmore Orchestra; "Cutie," by the same players; "Good-bye, Shanghai," by Nathan Glantz and his orchestra; "Stealing," by Lamin's Famous Players; "After the Rain," by the same organization, and "Thrills," by Nathan Glantz and his orchestra.
Everybody Talking Radio.
That the radio has captured popular fancy as nothing has done before is evident from the inquiries made for sets. Men and women, boys and girls, professional men and artisans; people in every walk of life are interested and are making arrangements to instal sets. A small army of Spencer employees and representatives of the Transcanada Radiovox Company is being kept busy attending to the hundreds of inquiries and orders that are being received, and the first 300 machines, which arrived on Tuesday and were cleared through the customs the same day, are nearly all spoken for . Today they will be placed on sale, and advance orders will be filled as rapidly as possible.
One big set is being installed in the Vancouver Club, and another in the home of George Pantages of the Pantages Theatre, who has also arranged for several artists from the Pantages programme to give numbers in tonight’s broadcast.
On Tuesday Spencer’s was again invaded by a crowd of interested spectators gathered around the receiving set installed in the big store. So great was the congestion on the first floor that it was found necessary to move the set to the fourth floor during the day, and in future radio fans who want to “listen in” through the courtesy of the David Spencer Company must take the elevator to the fourth floor.
But the best way is to get your own set, tune it to the 360-metre wave length, and "listen in" for Operator Jack Wilson's announcement of "This is the Vancouver World Radio Forecast. Operated from the roof of the David Spencer building, Vancouver, by the Transcanada Radiovox Company."
You’ll get it every day from 2 to 10 p.m. without fail, and with it all the latest music and all the latest news, with a nightly bed-time story for the kiddies.

WORLD'S RADIO BROADCAST

Today another big radio programme will be broadcasted by The World's radio station. The morning word was received officially that the 400-metre wave length was the wave length assigned permanently to The World radio, and all radio fans "listening In" to The World are informed that they must tune in to the 400 metre wave length.
Another big feature starts with today's radio. Through the courtesy of the David Spencer, Limited, phonograph department, a series of daily concerts will be broadcasted by The World transmitting station.
These programmes will be of numbers by such world famous artists as Caruso, Galli Curci, McCormaek, Elman, Farrar, Gluck, Melba, Butt, Tetrazzini, Patti, Kreisler and many others whose talented performances have placed them in the front ranks of the world’s most famous artists.
Today the first of such concerts begins, and a full programme of the pieces to be rendered is given below. These pieces will be played on the various schedules from 2 p. m. till 10 p. m., and in addition there will be the usual news bulletins and stock reports, together with the Children’s Bed Time story at 8:10 p. m.
The schedule hours are as follows:
2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Latest cable news from The World’s direct cable service with Great Britain; full developments of Irish and Labor situations in the Old country; latest stock quotations from Vancouver and New York stock exchanges. Musical numbers as per programme below:
3:30 pm. to 4 p.m.—Latest wires from House of Commons at Ottawa; news bulletins and stock exchange flashes; local news; special afternoon concert.
5:30 p m. to 7 p.m.—The World's radio dinner time concert, taken from specially selected records of world famous concert and operatic stars; late news flashes.
8 to 10 p.m.—Children's Bed Time story; big programme of instrumental and vocal numbers from selections given below; news flashes.
CONCERT PROGRAMME
(35713)—Medley Waltz, Nos. 1 and 2; "Popular Songs of Yesterday", Hackel-Berge Orchestra
(64424)—Song, "Who Knows?" John McCormack
(18831)—Fox trot, "The Sheik", Club Royal Orchestra
"Dapper Dan", Club Royal Orch.
(89001)—Duet, "La Forza del Destino", Caruso and Scotti
(18866)—Waltz, "Three o'clock in the Morning"; Fox trot, "Lola-lo", Joseph C. Smith's Orchestra
(64820)—Song, "Traviata-Sempre Libre” Galli-Curci
(17835)—Instrumental trio, "A Perfect Day" McKee Trio; "Mother Machree" McKee Trio
(74420)—Song, "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny", Alma Gluck
(16899)—Cornet Solo, "O Sole Mio", Renaldi
(17894)—Parody On Eight Familiar Songs and "The Father of 36", Nat Wills
(216359)—Fox Trot, "Catalina", "Look for the Silver Lining", Harry Thomas Trio
(64375)—"I'll Sing Thee Songs of Araby", John McCormack
(18849)—Hawaiian Guitars Duet, "Dream Kiss" and "Laughing Rag", Moore and Davis
(183011)—"Land of Hope and Glory", Clara Butt
(18835)—Fox trot, "My Sweet Gal"; "I'm Laughing All the Time", All Star Trio
(16488)—Ocarina solo, "First Kiss Waltz"; banjo solo, "Four Little Blackberries", Ossman
(17523)—“Woodland Echoes" and "Evening Chimes", Neapolitan Trio
(18863)--Fox trot, "Hortense", "Never Mind", All Star Trio
(18854)—Song, “Granny”, Rugel
Duet, “Ka-Lu-A”, Brown and Shaw
(88065)—Song, "Goodbye", Mme. Melba
(18862)—Song, "Leave Me With a Smile"; “April Showers,” Hamson.
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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Wed Mar 16, 2022 12:21 am

Bye-bye 360 metres!
The Vancouver World's station, later called CFYC, had been assigned 400 metres as its frequency in late March 1922 (by the Department of Fisheries?).
In a previous post, we mentioned a mysterious singer. It turns out the World story had his name wrong. It is correct here. Julius Elmer Tepoorten's family was in the wholesale drug business in Vancouver. He was about 29 when he appeared on the air. He received two meritorious service awards during WW1 for bravery in the trenches. He later moved to Los Angeles, became a film cutter, and was convicted of attempted extortion in 1933. He got probation because of his war record. He had a few other run-ins with the law on both sides of the border. He died in Vancouver in 1945; he had married his last wife five days before. She was a nurse.
Back to radio. The World station's music varied from Dixieland to opera.

Thursday, March 30, 1922
HEAR WORLD RADIO CLEAR AS A BELL ALL ALONG COAST
Distant Recipients Send Messages Telling How Well They Hear Broadcast Sent Out From This Newspaper's Powerful Sending Station
Still they get The World's radio clearer than ever and better than from any other sending station along the coast. Following the radio broadcast of Wednesday night more wires and messages were received at The World office. From Thurston Bay, B. C. via Bold Point came a wire over the government telegraph lines. It was sent in by Operator Gorman and read: "Your concert yesterday received O.K. at this station. It was very clear all through. Thanks."
Following it within a few minutes came another message from Friday Harbor, Washington, where John W. Douglas was "listening in" with Kilburn-Clark two-step machine.
"I wish to thank you for your broadcasting programme," said this radio fan. "It came in very strong here today. This is the first time I have picked up your music, but it is stronger and better than the others I have been receiving and I hope you keep up a regular programme."
Radio stations in Westminster and around the city again and again rang in to report perfect modulation and high satisfaction with the broadcast sent out by The World, and fresh inquiries were received during the day from Penticton, Albert Canyon, Kelowna, Malakwa, Qualicum Beach, Chilliwack and other points in the interior and along the coast.
Every radio fan in British Columbia is tuning in to the 400 metre wave length which has been officially given to The World radio, and all are getting splendid results. Every concert is being received and as one enthusiast says, "it is just as if someone in the next room was speaking, although in reality you are about 75 miles from here."
Orpheum Singer Performs.
On Wednesday afternoon radio fans had a real treat when J. Elmer Tepoorten, formerly with Leo Feist and the Orpheum Circuit, gave a special selection of three numbers, which he helped to make famous professionally. With a voice peculiarly suited for transmission over the radio, Mr. Tepoorten sang a novelty number, “From Here to Shanghai,” a song which he was the first singer to introduce into the United States in 1918. Modulation and tone were as clear as with the best Caruso records, and in response to several telephone calls from enthusiastic radio fans he sang in turn, "Somebody Stole My Gal" and "A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody," from the "Follies of 1920." Many requests have come in for repetition of these numbers, and Mr. Tepoorten will be heard in future radio concerts over The World's broadcast.
The Langley Prairie Picture Theatre is the first picture theatre in the province to take up the radio seriously. With a big receiving set installed in the treatre [sic], the management of the playhouse is arranging for a Scotch vocalist to sing Scotch songs over The World radio during the film “The Bonnie Brier Bush” on Saturday night. The Scotch numbers will be interspersed with the regular programme, and will commence at 9 o'clock, and it is the intention of the Langley Prairie picture house to take full advantage of the radio broadcast from The World in connection with all future films shown there.
Mayor Tisdall Will Speak.
Arrangements for the big concert by the Strathcona school in the First Presbyterian church on Friday night have now been completed, and appreciating the importance of the occasion and the objects for which the concert is being held, Mayor Tisdall has consented to give a ten-minute talk over the radio during the evening. This concert will be the first public radio concert to be held in the city, and will doubtless attract considerable attention, as it will be the first real opportunity for many to see radio actually at work.
The concert will start at 8 p.m. and continue until 10 o’clock, and in addition the radio numbers will be interspersed with several numbers by the school children themselves. Admission will be 50 cents.

WORLD'S RADIO BROADCAST
Through the courtesy of the phonograph department of David Spencer, Ltd., another big programme by world-famous instrumentalists and singers will be given over The World's radio broadcast today and repeated again this evening.
In addition to the regular programme of news bulletins and stock reports, and the Children's Bed-Time Story, which has made a remarkable hit with the radio fans, this programme will be broadcasted several times during the various schedules.
The complete radio broadcast for today is as follows:
2:00 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.—Latest cable news from The World's direct cable, including latest developments in the industrial and Irish situations In Great Britain; latest stock quotations: local news and bulletins from U. S. and Canada, Musical numbers as per programme.
3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.—Late wires from Ottawa press gallery, Canadian wires and late stock quotations; late local news; special afternoon concert.
5:30 to 7:00 p.m.—The World's radio dinner-time concert, taken from especially selected radiophone records by the world's most famous artists. Late news flashes and bulletins.
8:00 to 10:00 p.m.—Children's bed-time story; big programme of instrumental and vocal numbers by eminent concert and operatic singers; band and orchestral selections by the foremost musical organizations of the world. Late news flashes.

PROGRAMME FOR CONCERT
"Weep No More My Mammy", Fox Trot ..... Paul Whiteman's Orch.
"April Showers", Fox Trot ..... Whiteman's Orch.
"Pagliacci-Vesti la Giubba" (On With the Play) ...... Caruso
“Alice Where Art Thou", Violin Solo ..... Mischa Elman
"Ty-Tee", "Just a Little Love Song", Fox Trot ...... Paul Whiteman's Orch.
"Mary of Argyle", "Auld Scotch Songs" ..... Sir Harry Lauder
"Virginia Blues", "Venetian Love Boat", Fox Trot ...... Bengon Orchestra
"Little Town In the Ould County Down" ..... John McCormack
"Kiluna Waltz", "Hawaiian Waltz Medley", Guitar Duet ...... Lua-Kaili
"Lo, Hear the Gentle Lark" ...... Galli-Curci
“Railroad Blues", "Bow-Wow Blues", Fox Trot ....... Benson's Orchestra
"Birds and the Brook", "In Venice", Whistling Solo ....... Alice Shaw
Il Trovatore "Miserere", Duet ...... Aida and Caruso
"Uncle Josh Buys An Automobile", "Village Gossips" .... Cal Stewart
"Dangerous Blues", “Royal Garden Blues”, Fox Trot ......... Dixieland Jazz Band
"Dreaming Alone In the Twilight" ..... Werrenrath
"The Saftest of the Family", "He Was Very Kind to Me" .... Sir Harry Lauder
"Tales of Hoffman", "Barcarolle'' ......... John McCormack and Fritz Kreisler
"I'm Nobody’s Baby", "Listening", Fox Trot .......... All Star Trio
"I Ain't Nobody's Darling", "Dapper Dan" ................. Billy Jones
"Last Waltz", "Paul Jones" ........ Metropolitan Dance Band
"Shadow Song" ..... Galli-Curci
"Ti-O-San", "Remember the Rose" .... Raderman's Orchestra
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Re: CFYC March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Wed Mar 16, 2022 1:01 am

With this story, we've related the programming of all three Vancouver stations for March 1922 on this website. How interesting any of this is, I don't know, but it's here for reference.
Again, we get a list of records played on the air. Detailed lists of musical performances, live or otherwise, weren't uncommon in newspapers in the 1920s.
Radio couldn't exactly go on-location back then, so Jack Wilson covered a parade by getting people on the route phoning him information that he passed on to listeners. This would seem to be the first live news story covered on Vancouver radio.
As mentioned elsewhere, the "magnavox" was a horn speaker that had to be attached to the radio.
400 metres is 750 kHz.
It's a shame the station didn't play the Rega Orchestra's version of "I'm a Jazz Vampire" (1920). Rega was a handle for Fred Hager, the musical director for Okeh Records.
Pardon any uncorrected OCR errors.

Friday, March 31, 1922
WORLD RADIO TOLD JOFFRE'S PROGRESS MINUTE BY MINUTE
"Hello, Marshal Joffre of France! Hello, Marshal Joffre of France! Vancouver is waiting to welcome you, and all along the route to Blaine, and on into Seattle we are waiting to greet you, Marshal. This radio message is sent to you by the radio fans listening-in to the Vancouver World's radio broadcast, and it is to assure you of our warmest admiration and regard."
Operator Jack Wilson, himself a veteran of the world war, sent the above message into space on Thursday morning. Specially arranging to have an early morning session at the big high-powered transmitting station on top of the Spencer building, Wilson radioed his message out to sea to meet the incoming steamer which was carrying the world-famed soldier to Vancouver, and then during the time of the reception on the C. P. R. pier and the triumphant progress through the city. Operator Wilson radioed flashes giving full details of the welcome to the Marshal of France.
"Marshal Joffre is now leaving the depot. The crowds are cheering and cheering again," bulletined Wilson. "He is now on his way up Granville Street, and still the cheers keep rolling on. He is getting a great reception."
Round the park and all through the city the radio operator kept tab of the Marshal's movements, and radioed them minute by minute, being himself kept informed by telephone of the places where General Joffre had arrived and his next call.
It was only another example of what radio can do, and it stimulated the attack of "Radioitis," which is now spreading over Vancouver and the whole of British Columbia.
"Have you a little radio in your home?" is now the common greeting when friends meet, and the big army of radio fans is growing daily.
On Thursday The World's radio broadcast was again sent out with a full programme of musical numbers and all the latest news bulletins of the day, and again and again reports came in from enthusiastic amateurs to say that they were "getting it" perfectly.
Big Radio Concert Tonight.
But tonight the big majority of Vancouver citizens will get their first opportunity of seeing the radio in action for tonight is the night selected by the pupils of the Strathcona school to give the first public radio concert in Vancouver.
The concert will be given in the First Presbyterian church and will mark a milestone in the progress of radio in British Columbia. Promptly at 8:10 the concert will start. A big receiving set, with special booster magnovox [sic] has been installed in the church and tested out; the aerial has been strung and when Operator Wilson plugs in tonight the concert will be on.
His Worship Mayor Tisdall is opening the concert, and from the roof of the Spencer building he will talk over The World's transmitting station, and will then proceed to the concert to hear for himself how it sounds from the receiving end.
In addition to the remarks by the mayor, teachers from the school will talk over the radio, and a number of specially selected songs and instrumental solos will be given by school pupils and others.
From 8 o'clock until 9:55 the programme will be given, and interspersed with the radio concert will be a number of special turns by the Strathcona school pupils. So listen for it tonight radio fans, and others who have not yet had an opportunity of hearing the radio in action are advised to attend the concert at the First Presbtyerian [sic] church.
The concert will be given on the 400 metre wave length, over The World's high-powered transmission set, and will be a revelation to those who have not yet realized the possibilities of radio.

WORLD'S RADIO BROADCAST
Today another big programme of news bulletins and musical numbers will be sent out over The World radio broadcast, and from 8 to 10 p. m. radio fans "listening-in" will receive the full programme being given by the pupils of Strathcona school at the First Presbyterian church. Included in this radio concert will be a ten-minute talk by His Worship Mayor Tisdall, and a talk by Operator Jack Wilson explaining in non-technical language the mysteries and possibilities of radio.
The various schedules sent out will be as follows:
2 p. m. to 2:45 p. m.—Late cables from The World's direct European cable; full reports of Irish situation and labor developments in Great Britain; latest stock quotations from Vancouver and New York exchanges; special musical numbers from programme below.
3:30 p. m. to 4 p. m.—Latest wires from House of Commons, Ottawa; news bulletins and stock exchange flashes; local news; special afternoon concert.
4:30 to 7 p. m.—The World's special dinner time radio concert by world famous concert singers and operatic stars; selections by world's premier musical organizations.
8 to 10 p. m.— A Children’s Bed-Time story and first public radiophone concert in First Presbyterian Church by pupils of Strathcona school. This will include a ten-minute talk over the radio by Mayor Tisdall. Special community singing led by the radio operators; talks by school teachers and an explanation of radio by an expert, together with a full concert programme.
PROGRAMME FOR CONCERT
Special Records from David Spencer, Ltd., Phonograph Department
"Do You Ever Think of Me"; "Cuban Eyes", Fox Trot ....... Rega Orchestra
"When You and I Were Young Maggie", Song ..... Evan Williams
"Fair One" (One Step); “Broadway Blues" (Fox Trot) .......... Melody Men
"Bonnie Sweet Bessie", Song ..... Tetrazzini
"Bright Eyes”, Fox Trot ..... Rego [sic] Orchestra
"Honolulu Eyes", Waltz ..... Martucci's Orchestra
"Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep"; "Over the Hill", Song ... Lewis James
"Danny Boy", Song .... E. Schuman Heink
“Oh, Me! Oh, My!"; "Learn to Smile", Fox Trot .... Paul Whiteman's Orch.
"Oh, Lovely Night", Song ..... Mme. Melba
"I've Got the Blues", Fox Trot ...... Van Epps Quartette
"Stop It", One Step ........ Diamond Trio
"Dear Old Pal of Mine", Song ............ John McCormack
"Dixi", One Step ...... Van Epps Quartette
"Tippy Canoe" ..... Waltz Diamond Trio
"Where the Sweet Daddy's Grow", One Step ........ Raderman's Orchestra
"Whan the Clouds Roll By", Fox Trot ..... H. Thomas trio
"For You Alone", Song .......... E. Caruso
"Feather Your Nest"; "Margie", Song ....... Lewis James
"A Baby In Love"; "Who'll Be the Next One", Fox Trot .......... Colman's Orchestra "
“By the Waters of Minnetonka", Song ....... Frances Alda
"Darling" (Fox Trot); "Pitter-Patter" (Waltz) ....... Melody Man
"Broadway Rose", Song ... Chas. Harrison
Rose, Song ........ Lewis James
"Love Bird", Fox Trot ...... Martucci's Orchestra
“Alabama Moon”, Waltz ....... Martucci's Orchestra
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