CJCE March 1922

A look back at various radio stations

CJCE March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Sun Mar 06, 2022 7:14 pm

Since this month marks the 100th anniversary of radio in Vancouver, let's pick up stories about the Sun station, CJCE, which was run for the newspaper by the Sprott-Shaw school. You can find the paper's stories about the first week of programming here: https://radiowest.ca/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=3146

To recap, the Sun station signed on days after the Daily Province station. The Sun simply ignored the fact and pretended it was first.

There is no mention of call-letters. Whether they had been assigned, I don't know. 200 metres is 1500 kHz.

Note that if you were an American, you couldn't own a radio in Vancouver at one time. British subjects only.

Some of the terminology has changed over the years. A "station" in the stories below sometimes refers to a receiving station, ie. someone's radio.

The Barron Hotel referred to was at 1002 Granville at Nelson.

My apologies if I've missed any OCR errors.

Sunday, March 19, 1922
SUN RADIO SERVICE TO USE "CLASSIC" PHONOGRAPH
Musical Programme to Be Given by "Made-in-B. C." Phonograph
Arrangements have now been completed whereby The Sun is to use the new "Classic" phonograph exclusively for the Radio Concerts which are now being given each evening. The "Classic" will be installed In a special concert room and the recordings of the world's greatest artists, together with the latest popular selections, will be sent out by radio. The clear, natural, non-metallic tones of the "Classic" lends itself to such use better than the old style phonographs using mica diaphragms and will enable all classes of music to be reproduced.
It is interesting to note that it is a local manufactured phonograph, made by the Artcraft Phonograph Co. Ltd., with showrooms at 985 Granville Street, which has won such success in the musical world of late, and is making its appearance in increasing numbers in Vancouver's homes.
Music-lovers know that today the phonograph is more than a musical instrument, that rapid strides have been made in the last few years in phonograph construction, but until the advent of the "Classic" the degree to which this perfection had reached had never been realized.

Monday, March 20, 1922
SUN BROADCAST PLEASES PUBLIC
Many Requests Made Daily For the Radiophone Receiving Sets
Having inaugurated the broadcasting of news and music by newspapers in Canada, The Vancouver Sun has made it possible for the city publicity department to say that Vancouver is right up to the minute in progressiveness, and that the public institutions are giving a service to the city and surrounding country at large that probably is not equalled elsewhere in Canada.
Visitors to the city, and there will be many this summer, will get a very favorable impression of the prevailing progressive spirit when they observe that coupled with many natural advantages, Vancouver is quick to apply the developments of scientific research to everyday life.
Judging by the number of inquiries made at The Vancouver Sun there must be hundreds of people anxious to instal radiophone receiving sets. The first question usually asked is: "How can I hear The Sun Radio programme," and then: "Where can I buy the receiving apparatus."
The wireless telephone receiving set is a very small instrument, so easy to operate that anyone can instal it. An aerial wire is required, stretching along the roof of the house, or strung from the garage to the house. This is connected to the instrument and you listen by means of small ear phones attached. An amplifying horn can also be obtained permitting anyone in the room to hear.
These can be obtained at any electrical store, although at present the demand is much greater than the supply and none of the city stores have them on hand. In due course, advertisements will advise where they can be obtained and a watch on the advertising columns is suggested.
In line with its leadership in developing the wireless telephone service, The Vancouver Sun is taking active steps to spread knowledge of this wonderful invention. Radio articles will appear regularly and it is suggested that interested parties get in touch with the B. C. Radio Association, an organization of amateurs doing much for the development of wireless work in the city, and having headquarters at the Sprott Shaw School, 336 Hastings Street West. Notes on the activities of that body will be found on another page of this morning's issue.
The wireless telephone has been so perfected that the voice can be transmitted clearly and over great distances and musical selections have been sent so perfectly that persons hundreds of miles away from the transmitting apparatus can dance and sing to the music.

Tuesday, March 21, 1922
Ready, Radio Fans! Vaudeville Stars On Sun Broadcast
Concert Tonight Will Prove Treat; Popular Soprano to Be Heard
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
"This is the Sun Radio Broadcast."
At that signal get tuned to 200 metres as The Vancouver Sun's radio concert tonight should be just about the best since The Vancouver Sun brought radio broadcasting to Vancouver. By arrangement with the Pantages Theatre tonight's progragramme [sic] of music will be featured by the singing of a pretty lady. Miss Emma Heit of the Skelly and Heit Revue has consented to project her fine soprano voice into The Vancouver Sun's transmitter.
It is hoped that The Vancouver Sun will be able to prevail upon Miss Heit's husband to allow her to coo a few words into the ether and perhaps a kiss or two. After the happy possessors of radio receiving sets have heard Miss Heit sing they may clear away the tables and chairs and prepare to dance for G. Wessey Johnson [sic] and his company of colored harmonists, who work wonders on the piano, banjo, two saxophones and traps, will play two or three intensely syncopated fox trots. Mr. Johnson and his orchestra are also from this week's bill at the Pantages Theatre.
The Vancouver Sun's broadcast last night went over in grand style. R. M. Ellis, a prominent North Shore amateur, phoned the Radio Man at The Vancouver Sun stating that the music was so loud and clear that he was able to give a dance to the music of The Vancouver Sun's transmitter.
Cecil West, Radio 5 C.N., situated on Shaughnessy Heights, reported the music and speech clear and the modulation perfect [sic]. These are but two of the many reports from stations all over the district stating that The Vancouver Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station could be easily heard.
Returned soldiers at the Shaughnessy Hospital were given a treat last night as The Vancouver Sun has installed a receiver and amplifier at the hospital to work in conjunction with the broadcasting station so that these fellows will now be able to lie in their beds and hear the latest news and sport returns that are sent out every night at 7:30 p.m. by The Vancouver Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station. Great delight was shown by these boys at being able to hear without leaving the room all the latest news of the day as it comes off the wires. It was requested that an extension be put in at the isolation hospital so that those who are confined there will be able to enjoy a concert and news report made possible by The Vancouver Sun's Radiophone in an effort to give to the public the best news service that science will permit.
Those amateurs who are using a vacuum valve detector should be careful that you do not get your valve regenerating as this will distort the music and speech.

Programme of Concert By Sun Radio
THE programme arranged for The Vancouver Sun's Radiophone Broadcast tonight on a 200-metre wave, length is as follows:
6:00 p.m.—Market returns and a summary of news reports received up to that time.
6:15—Concert numbers.
6:30—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
6:45—Musical selections.
8:30—Miss Heit of the Pantages theatre will give a vocal selection, followed by two or three numbers by G. Wesley Johnson and his syncopated orchestra.
8:45—Final news flashes from every corner of the world, including important local news. The musical numbers that will be broadcasted are:
"Southern Melody."
"Overture of William Tell, Parts 1 and 2."
"Leave Me With a Smile."
"Birds of a Feather."
"Brother Low Down."
"Everybody Step."
"Hardingo."
"God Save the King."
The Classical phonograph, a made-in-B. C. product, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for broadcasting the musical programme, are both supplied by courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.

Wednesday, March 22, 1922
SUN TO BROADCAST AT NOON TODAY NEWS DIGEST, MARKET REPORTS OVER RADIOPHONE
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO! "This is The Sun Radio Broadcast."
Be ready to get that signal today at 12 o'clock noon. Realizing what an important part radiophone broadcasting plays in the business world, The Sun has arranged to broadcast the latest flashes of news from all over the world and the market reports today at noon from The Sun's Radio Broadcasting station.
Business men will now be able to lunch with a pair of wireless receivers on their ears and learn the latest stock quotations.
Hockey returns were sent out to all stations within a thousand-mile radius of The Vancouver Sun's Radio broadcasting station last night, and numerous radio “bugs” in the district reported that it was good as being at the game.
ARTIST DELIGHTS HUNDREDS
Later on in the evening, after the latest news and market flashes were transmitted, radio fans were given a rare treat through the courtesy of Miss Emma Heit of the Skelly and Heit Revue which is delighting thousands at the Pantages theatre this week. Accompanied by Leslie Hutchinson at the piano, she projected her fine soprano voice into The Vancouver Sun's transmitter. "Maytime," a wonderful ballad that is making a hit on Broadway this season, was the selection she rendered to all within a radius of hundreds of miles. Following this G. Wesley Johnson and his syncopated orchestra, who are also on this week's bill at the Pantages, gave those listening in on the other end the thrill of their lives when they filled the ether with the opening bars of "The Sheik."
G Newmarch, an amateur, situated at 1439 Comox Street, reported that he was clearing away tables and chairs and was going to have a dance to the tune of the radiophone orchestra made possible with The Vancouver Sun's radio broadcasting station.
The soldiers at the Shaughnessy Hospital were again highly elated with The Vancouver Sun's broadcast and concert, and were all listening intently to hear Miss Heit's number and the jazz orchestra.
Through the courtesy of Miss Heit and G. Wesley Johnson The Vancouver Sun will be able to give all who are listening in at the appointed time another selection by Miss Heit and also one or two of the latest fox-trots syncopated by Mr. Johnson's orchestra tonight.
Operators on both ship and land—commercial and amateur stations—will be able to hear The Vancouver Sun's radio broadcasting station at 11 o'clock noon and again at 7:30 p.m. Be sure to tune sharp to 200 metres.

Sun Radio Programme
The programme arranged for The Vancouver Sun's Radio broadcast today on a 200-metre wave length is as follows:
12 noon—Market returns and a summary of news reports received up to that time.
7:30 p.m.—Market returns and a summary of news reports received up to that time.
7:45—Concert numbers.
8:00—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15—Musical selections.
8:30—Miss Heit of the Pantages theatre will give a vocal selections [sic], followed by two or three numbers by G. Wesley Johnson and his orchestra.
8:45—Final flashes from every corner of the world, including important local news.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B.C. product, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, are both supplied by courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.

Thursday, March 23, 1922
SUN RADIO BROADCAST HEARD IN SACRAMENTO; BIG CONCERT TONIGHT
“HELLO! Hello! Hello! This is The Sun Radio Broadcast.”
The Vancouver Sun is now the official organ of the B. C. Radio Association. This decision was made at the regular meeting of the association hold last night.
The proposal by The Sun to have a "Radio Corner" every Wednesday morning in which all the current events and doings of the Radio Association and the amateurs of B. C. will be chronicled, as well special articles on the construction of radio receiving stations, was favorably received by the members of the club. To those people who realize the advantages brought about by The Sun in installing a radio broadcasting station and who are contemplating the installation of a receiving set by means of which they can hear all the latest news as sent out by The Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station, it would be advisable to watch this "Radio Corner" every week. Much valuable information as to how to install the apparatus and where it can be obtained will be contained in this column.
The British Columbia Radio Association will hold a special get-together meeting on March 29 at their club rooms, 336 Hastings Street West, to which all those interested in Radiophone broadcasting are invited.
Reports are being received at The Sun office from near and far as to the success of The Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station. R. Lindhal, Radio 7 M.P., situated at Boseman, Montana, reported that on the night of March 21, The Sun's radio broadcast could be easily heard at his station.
Erwin Anderson, Radio 6 G.R., located at Sacramento, reports that the carrier wave of The Sun’s broadcasting station could be easily heard there, but owing to interference from other stations near him, he has been unable to hear all the conversation.
H. Mason of Seattle states that when the local stations are not working he has been able to copy the reports sent out by The Sun.
Miss Emma Heit and G. Wesley Johnson and his orchestra of the Pantages Theatre, have contented to render a few selections over The Sun's radiophone again tonight.

Sun Radio Programme
The programme for The Vancouver Sun's broadcast tonight on a 200-metre wave length is as follows:
7:30 p.m.—Market returns and a summary of news reports received up to that time.
7:40—Musical selections.
7:50—G. Wesley Johnson and his syncopated orchestra will play one or two of the latest dance creations.
8:00—Important news flashes from all parts of the world.
8:15—Miss Emma Heit of the Pantages theatre will give a vocal selection.
8:25—Final news flashes, including important local news.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B.C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, are both supplied by courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.

Friday, March 24, 1922.
Harmony Club Will Give Concert Tonight Over the Sun Radio
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO! This is The Sun Radio Broadcast.
The Harmony Club of Vancouver has kindly consented to give a radio concert transmitted from The Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station tonight at 8 p.m., and continuing on until 8:30. This should be a real treat to the radio fans in and around Vancouver and it will be the first of its kind in British Columbia since the Sun brought Radio Broadcasting to the Province. In addition to this special feature the regular news reports and concert numbers will be broadcasted.
A comprehensive story of the hockey game at Toronto was broadcasted last night and given to the public hours before it appeared in print. Radio fare reported that the broadcast of the hockey game was exceptionally clear and, loud.
"It was just like being at the game," exclaimed one amateur.
Through the foresight of The Vancouver Sun such things as this have been made possible by the installation of The Vancouver Sun Radio Broadcasting Station. The most wonderful part about it is that anyone who wishes can install a set to hear these broadcasts. They can sit in their room at home and hear over the radiophone a story of a hockey game from play to play although staged over 3,000 miles away. If that does not interest them the latest stock reports and news items can be heard as well as special concert numbers, one of the features of The Vancouver Sun’s programme every night.

Sun Radio Programme
The programme for The Vancouver Sun's broadcast tonight on a 200 metre wavelength is as follows:
7:30—Market returns and a summary of news reports received up to that time.
7:45—Musical selections.
8:00—A special concert by the Harmony Club of Vancouver. The following selections will be rendered:
Pianoforte, "Love Song," Schuman-Liszt; "Polichinelle," Rachmaninoff; [“]Spanish Caprice,” Mezkowsky; Miss Bessie Dunsmuir.
Vocal, "First Rose of Summer," Kern; (Popular); Mr. Howard Macaulay, tenor.
Cornet solo, "O Sole Mio," Di Capua; "Oh, Promise Me," De Koven; Mr. Roy Hunter.
Vocal, "A Heap of Rose Leaves," Willeby; (Popular); Miss Audrey Mildmay, soprano.
Violin solo, Mr. Jones.
8:25—Final news flashes from all parts of the world, including important local news.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B.C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.

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Re: CJCE March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Mon Mar 07, 2022 7:08 am

Here's a final week's worth of stories about the Sun radio station from March 1922, its first month in operation. The station was CJCE but doesn't seem to have used call-letters. It was also about to change frequencies.

The March 28th has some words inserted in the middle of a sentence that also appeared in the column next to it, so the line doesn't make sense.

Pianist Stuart Kyle was a salesman at the newspaper.

It seems Artcraft Phonograph had a store at 985 Granville but offices on Pender.

The less said about the Toronto vs. Vancouver hockey series, the better.

Again, I hope I've corrected all the OCR errors.

Saturday, March 25, 1922
PREMIER SENDS HIS CONGRATULATIONS TO B. C. VIA SUN RADIO
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Broadcast.
"I heartily congratulate The Vancouver Sun upon installing the first radiophone service in Canada. Please permit me through this new medium to extend to the people of British Columbia congratulations upon the distinction which they enjoy of being the first to benefit by the introduction to our Dominion of his latest advance in the agencies of communication.
—Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King, Premier of Canada."
Such was the message from the Premier of Canada to the people of British Columbia broadcasted by The Sun Radio station last night. The message was taken up by hundreds of amateurs within a radius of a thousand miles of Vancouver.
For the first time in the history of British Columbia a complete concert was sent out from The Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station last night. Through the courtesy of the Harmony Club of Vancouver a complete musical recital was broadcasted. The programme Included: Pianoforte, "Love Song," Schuman-Liszt, by Bessie Dunsmuir; vocal, "First Rose of Summer," Howard Macaulay; cornet solo, Roy Hunter; vocal, "A Heap of Rose Leaves," Miss Audrey Mildmay. The concert was concluded by "The Sheik." a cornet solo by Roy Hunter, accompanied by Miss Hazel Fremlin. Reports received from stations who were listening in at the time of the concert state that both the instrumental and vocal solos were clear and loud.
Mr. Howard, assistant radio inspector at Victoria, was present at The Sun Radio Broadcasting Station last night while the concert was being broadcasted and expressed the opinion that it certainly was successful.
Sun Radio Programme
The programme for The Vancouver Sun's broadcast tonight on a 200 metre wave-length is as follows:
6:30—Bulletins on the hockey game at Toronto, market returns and news reports received up to that time.
6:45—Musical selections.
7:00—Final hockey results and news flashes.
8:00—Latest news and market report from all parts of the world.
8:15—Concert numbers.
8:30—Final news reports, including all local important news.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B. C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.

Sunday, March 26, 1922
The Sun Extends Its Popular Radio Broadcast Service
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Broadcast!
With The Sun's Broadcasting station perfected and news reports sent out each evening to stations within a radius of a thousand miles, the isolation of the country districts has been finally broken.
Reports received from the interior state that The Sun Radio Broadcast is quite easily picked up and that no trouble is experienced in keeping in touch with the outside world since The Vancouver Sun installed its Radio Broadcasting station.
Hundreds of inquiries have been received at The Sun office from inland points, where it is only possible to get news from the outside world once or twice a week, asking instructions as to where apparatus may be obtained for the construction of receiving sets so that it may be possible to make use of this new and most advanced news service incorporated by The Vancouver Sun for the first time in Canada.
SET FOR SUMMER CAMP
Plans are now underway for the construction of a complete receiving set which will be installed at the summer camp of the Y. M. C. A. With this set in operation at the camp residents around Hopkins Landing will be able to hear all the latest news as it comes in off the wires. No doubt this will also be featured at some of the numerous other seaside reports along the coast.
The receiving set recently installed at the Shaughnessy Military Hospital is now in perfect working order and the boys there find much enjoyment in being able to hear all the latest news and concert numbers broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun's Radio Broadcasting station.
MID-DAY SERVICE
Owing to the fact that Radiophone broadcasting has taken such a boom in British Calumbia [sic] and that many operators are continually listening in, hoping that they will be able to catch some of the latest news reports sent out from The Sun's Radio Broadcasting station, it has been decided to inaugurate a mid-day service between 12:30 and 1 o'clock each day. This new service will start on Monday.
SERIES OF LECTURES
Arrangements are being made to have a series of lectures on wireless transmitted from The Sun’s Radio Broadcasting station in the near future. No definite date has yet been set but it is expected that it will be some time during this week.
There will be no Broadcast from The Sun Radiophone station on Sunday night, but as usual the regular service will commence again Monday from 12:30 noon to 1:00 p.m., and again from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Particularly effective has been the Radio service on the Stanley Cup hockey series at Toronto, keeping Vancouver—beg pardon, British Columbia—fans informed as to the struggle tor the world’s championship.

Monday, March 27, 1922
NEW MID-DAY SERVICE SUN RADIO BROADCAST
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio Broadcast.
Owing to the fact that radiophone broadcasting has taken such a hold in Vancouver lately The Vancouver Sun has decided to send out from The Vancouver Sun's Radio Broadcasting station a special mid-day service, beginning at 12:30 noon and continuing on until 1:00 p.m. The noon broadcast will include flashes of all the latest news reports received up to that time and special concert numbers. The regular broadcast in the evening will be sent out as usual from 7:30 to 8:30 o clock.
The mid-day broadcast has been inaugurated to give to the public the best news service possible free to those who have radio receiving sets. An extra special service will be sent out from The Vancouver Sun's Radio Broadcasting station, starting at 6:15 p.m., giving a complete and comprehensive story of the final world series hockey game between the Vancouver Millionaires and the Toronto St. Patrick's at Toronto.
The Sun, in an effort to give the public the best service possible, have asked permission to work on a higher wave length, and within the next few days a change in the wave length of The Sun Radio Broadcasting Station will be announced. The new wave will be 420 metres. This will give to the stations much more power and those who have sets that are now outside the sending radius of The Vancouver Sun's Radio Broadcasting Station will be able to hear the news reports and concert numbers sent out each evening.
The annual meeting of the British Columbia Radio Association will be held Wednesday night at the Sprott Shaw School, Hastings Street, at 8 p.m. Those who have receiving sets installed and are not members of this association, as well as those who are contemplating the installation of receiving sets, are invited to attend. The association will be only too glad to give information to those who wish to install a radio set.
The programme for The Vancouver Sun's Broadcast today on a 200-metre wave length is as follows:
12:30 a.m.—Latest news and market reports.
12:45 a.m.—Musical selections.
1 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world, including important local news happenings.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B. C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.

Tuesday, March 28, 1922
LAYMEN CAN LEARN ABOUT WIRELESS
The Sun Will Tomorrow Start Series of Articles Giving Instruction
The Vancouver Sun's programme to be broadcast by The Vancouver Sun Radiophone Limited, on a 200-metre wave length at noon today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
12:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
6:15 p.m.—Bulletin on the hockey game at Toronto.
7:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world, including important local news happenings.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B. C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.
Hello! Hello! Hello!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited.
In order that the hundreds of amateurs who are nightly listening in to The Sun programme, broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited, may gain the very latest Information available, The Sun will publish a series of articles embracing a wireless instruction course, the first article of which will appear in this paper tomorrow morning. This course is specially arranged for the laymen and should prove of more than ordinary interest.
Experiments are now being carried out with a view to ascertaining the best type of set to receive The Sun's [gave his services in the erection of the international peace portal at Blaine, Washington, symbolic of 100] tails and plans will be published in The Sun.
SPECIAL SERVICE TONIGHT
The special set for the reception of The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited, broadcast, will not have such a wide range as other receiving sets, but it will, no doubt, be able to receive the wave of 420 metres much more efficiently, than sets of other types.
A special service will be given, tonight, to the hockey fans and The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited. Station will start broadcasting at 6:15 p.m., so as to be able to let the public have a complete comprehensive story of the final world's championship hockey game at Toronto between the Vancouver Millionaires and the Toronto St. Patricks. The regular noon service, which proved so popular when it was sent out for the first time Monday, beginning at 12:30 noon and continuing on until 1 p.m., will be broadcasted as well as the evening broadcast, which will begin at 7:30 and continue until 8:30.
REPORTS INVITED
Amateurs in the interior are asked to report to The Radio Editor of The Vancouver Sun, giving complete data as to how The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited, broadcast is being received in the Interior. It is only by this means that the management is able to check up the broadcast in an effort to give to the public the best service possible.

Wednesday, March 29, 1922
MISSION AMATEUR WILL “LISTEN” IN
Hockey Bulletins Included in Sun Programme Broadcasted Last Night
The Vancouver Sun's programme to be broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun's Radiophones Limited, on a 200-metre wave-length at noon today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
12:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B. C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun Radio programme broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones Limited. Starting at 8 p.m. last night, bulletins of the hockey game at Toronto were broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophone Limited to the hundreds of amateur and commercial stations within range. Also at 7.30 p.m. the regular broadcast was transmitted, which included all the latest news reports and market returns.
Mission City will soon listen-in on The Sun's radio programme transmitted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones Limited broadcasting station. A. Fisher, a promising young amateur, has been in the city for the past few days making arrangements for the shipment of a complete receiving set to Mission. It is expected that the receiving station will be in operation within the next few days.
Many reports were received at the Sun office last evening stating that the service given over the radiophone during the hockey game was the best ever. Stations reporting stated that the modulation was perfect and the speech absolutely undistorted. In fact, it was so good that at some stations the broadcast could be easily read with the phones on the table. The music was so loud and clear that a loud attachment on the receiving set the music could be used for dancing.

Thursday, March 30, 1922
RADIO BROADCAST ON AGAIN TODAY
Interesting Programme Is Again Arranged for Noon and Evening
The Vancouver Sun's programme to be broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun's Radiophones Limited, on a 200-metre wave length at noon today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
12:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Concert numbers.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes, including important local news happenings.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B. C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.
Hello! Hello! Hello!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited.
Tonight another complete and comprehensive digest of the latest world’s new will be broadcasted. Those “listening” in being furnished with red-hot news right off The Sun’s special cables and leased telegraph wires.
In addition to the ordinary news distribution, the very latest local, sport and market news will be furnished, as well as the usual high-class concert and musical selections.
REPORTS INVITED.
Amateurs in the interior are asked to report to The Radio Editor of The Vancouver Sun, giving complete data as to how The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited, broadcast is being received in the interior. It is only by this means that the management is able to check up the broadcast in an effort to give the public the best service possible.

Friday, March 31, 1922
NEW FEATURE IN SUN BROADCAST
Piano Selections, the First to Be Attempted, to Be Sent Out Tonight
The Vancouver Sun's programme to be broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones Limited, on a 200-metre wave length at noon today and tonight, is as follows:
12:30 p.m.—Latest news and market reports.
12:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
1:00 p.m.—Final news reports from all parts of the world.
7:30 p.m.—News reports and market returns.
7:45 p.m.—Musical selections.
8:00 p.m.—Special slow speech broadcast for ships at sea.
8:15 p.m.—Piano selections by Stuart Kyle.
8:30 p.m.—Final news flashes, including important local news happenings.
The Classic phonograph, a made-in-B. C. production, and Apex records, a Canadian-made product, used for playing musical selections, are both supplied by the courtesy of the Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver.
HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!
This is The Sun radio programme broadcasted by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones, Limited.
In addition to the regular concert numbers last evening, a special feature was introduced into the programme—"A Bed-time Story for the Children," recited by Frank Orr. The story was reproduced from an Apex record played on a Classic phonograph, by courtesy of The Artcraft Phonograph Company of Vancouver. Reports received during the evening stated that the modulation was even better than on any previous occasion and the audibility of the broadcast was much higher than before.
As a special feature of The Sun's radio programme to be broadcasted tonight by The Vancouver Sun Radiophones Limited, Stuart Kyle, well-known local pianist, has consented to give over the radiophone one or two classical selections and, for those who perhaps like a touch of jazz, a popular number or two. This has been made possible by the introduction of microphones over a piano on the mezzanine floor of the Barron Hotel.
The Vancouver Sun is the only paper in Canada to attempt such a feat. It was tried a number of days ago and met with remarkable success, and a great number of those listening-in stated that the reproduction was much better than that from gramophone records, and have asked that it be tried again.
In addition to these special features, the regular noon and evening broadcast consisting of a comprehensive digest of all the latest news and market reports will be given out.
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Re: CJCE March 1922

Postby jon » Mon Mar 07, 2022 1:40 pm

cart_machine wrote:The station was CJCE but doesn't seem to have used call-letters.

I rely on Mary Vipond's "Listening In", subtitled "The first decade of Canadian broadcasting 1922-1932" text book.

In it, she says that "private commercial broadcasting" licenses did not exist until April 1, 1922. She implies that these licenses saw the first use of call letters in the CF to CK range.

Bottom line: the CJCE call letters were not assigned until the Sun got its private commercial broadcasting license some time in the month of April, as CJCE is listed in her book in a table of all the private commercial broadcasting licenses issued up to April 30, 1922.
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Re: CJCE March 1922

Postby cart_machine » Mon Mar 07, 2022 2:33 pm

That makes sense to me. It seems odd the Americans were already using call letters, but radio stations here were not required to give a proper ID to open transmissions.

cArtie.
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Re: CJCE March 1922

Postby jon » Mon Mar 07, 2022 4:25 pm

cart_machine wrote:That makes sense to me. It seems odd the Americans were already using call letters, but radio stations here were not required to give a proper ID to open transmissions.

cArtie.

Back to Mary Vipond's book, broadcasting was licensed prior to April 1, 1922, mostly with experimental licenses, though it was also permitted with an amateur ("ham") license. Both apparently had call letters, and were required to ID.

The only Canadian experimental license prior to April 1, 1922, that I know the call letters for is CFCF, which was XWA.
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